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AIBU to feel U that no one can help me!!!( mini tennis)

(62 Posts)
burstingbaboon Mon 19-Aug-13 15:01:09

Hi ! Hope someone can help! I already posted in education thread but no one answered!!!!shock
I was wondering if anyone's dc does tennis! Can someone please advice me about competitions , how do you enter your child and how does it work?! Any advice will be highly appreciated !!!! Thank you so much!!!!!

valiumredhead Mon 19-Aug-13 17:05:26

Ds does tennis. The coach organises everything when they are ready to enter.

valiumredhead Mon 19-Aug-13 17:14:32

When she's ready the coach will tell you ime and they enter her. How long has she been doing it?

burstingbaboon Mon 19-Aug-13 17:26:32

For a year. The thing is her coach is telling me for the past 3-4 months that I need to take her. It's one of the ways that kids get more confidence, it motivates them more etc, but she is not doing any competitions. She told me to become member of lta ( which we did) , that to look for middlesex county lta ( we did) but what then? She doesn't do competitions. There is a boy who started at the same time and I do speak a bit with his DM. She is very nice lady and she told me that he did more then 60 tournaments. What???? I was too intimidated to even ask for info. Felt like I am some dumpy, honestly. That's why I came here for more advice. Thank you.

valiumredhead Mon 19-Aug-13 17:27:58

Oh good Lord, that's not my experience at all. I have no advice, sorry.

primallass Mon 19-Aug-13 17:35:16

You should be able to search on the LTA website for tournaments. My DS has done a couple.

BlingBang Mon 19-Aug-13 17:37:59

My kids coaches don't organise their competitions. You can talk to them about it but it's up to the parents to do the leg work. Other places are different and the coaches take the kids to tournaments etc and are more hands on. Many young kids are very serious about competitions and travel quite a distance nearly every weekend so you have to decide how serious you want to get which usually costs megabucks from what I've seen and is very time consuming. You can stick to local comps of course but that can be quite limited though London might be different of course with the higher population.

burstingbaboon Mon 19-Aug-13 17:38:05

Primallass. Do you just book, pay and show up? Thank you.

burstingbaboon Mon 19-Aug-13 17:41:16

BlingBang. I will travel, it's ok. She really likes it, she works really hard and I don't mind. I would like to ask you, is it book, pay and show up? If that's how it works , yes I will take her as far as I can. Thank you sooo much.

BlingBang Mon 19-Aug-13 19:55:34

Not done that many outside our own center. But afaik you just apply through the lta website (obviously check it's at a level she feels comfortable with). The tournament organiser should email you with confirmation and details (the lta website doesn't usually have timings) and you just pay when you get there.

pianodoodle Mon 19-Aug-13 20:03:03

I am a private tutor (music)

I wouldn't expect my students' parents to know what to do regarding exams and competitions I would advise them and then if wanted, enter them myself.

Definitely speak to coach smile

DeWe Mon 19-Aug-13 20:22:27

I did tennis LTA tournaments at low level, and assuming it hasn't changed:

You're looking for the 10 and under competitions (it's age on 1st January that counts, so if she's had her birthday then she'll still be 10 and under next year).

You will need to find out the tournament referee and apply some time in advance. they may only take the first certain number (often not many in under 10s, perhaps 16) and it will be first come first served. You will pay for this as you apply, if you don't go, then you lose the money.

In under 10s it's often round robin (everyone plays each otherand sometimes those results are used for a knockout competition so they got lots of matches)

You will be required to be available all the tournament time until you're knocked out. You will receive a message telling you the time of the first match, and after that you're assumed to be available. You generally can't say you're busy (one person was knocked out for attending her dad's funeral in my first tournament) Even if it's raining you have to wait through it.

Finals are usually held on the last day and prizes (trophy for winner, runner up and possible a small cash prize-I am talking small, often not more than the entry fee) presented. You won't make a profit that's for sure. I won all tournaments entered one year, and if you took petrol into consideration (but not equipment) it didn't cover it.

You need to make sure she can do her own calling (out/in) and keep score. It is entirely up to her (not you) when she's on court. You don't interfere at all even if the other person's a pain. You can appeal to the tournament referee and, if he thinks you have a case, then he can send someone to umpire.

And be prepared for her to lose. Sometimes a lot. When I played it wasn't infrequent that someone turned up to a tournament thinking they were the next best thing, and got completely knocked off court. I remember one saying to me in bewilderment "but my coach said I was good", difficult to answer when they've been thoroughly beaten by everyone. Some children thrive in the competition, some sink. The first season often lose quite a bit simply because they're getting used to it.

They may need to play a number of matches on a day, being too tired isn't an excuse for not playing. In round Robins (often only best of 7 games or 1 set or something) they may play the entire tournament in one day. If playing the best of three sets, they can be asked to play 2 full matches in a day with only half an hour between them. I came off once after a 3 hour match and had only forty minutes before I went back on

And there will be some overly competitive parents (remember one pair who used to sit either side of the court keeping a running commentry on their car phones through the whole match-that was in the late 80s!) and some nasty children (one at our club was known as Brat Mac for very good reason!)

burstingbaboon Mon 19-Aug-13 21:26:33

Thank you all for lovely and very informative replies. DeWe, that's info that I was looking for, thank you so much. She is good girl,down to Earth( for now) but competative! Which in a way is good!
I don't even think about profit, I just want her to get the feeling of competition, meeting other kids and understand more rules and tennis. You made me soooo happy, I got more information from you than I expected, thank you so much.

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