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Dogs on beaches. Why?

(307 Posts)
Chickensarmpit Sat 20-Jul-13 17:23:08

Today i took my 3 young kids to the beach for a rare day out.
It was ruined by dogs!
They shit all over the place, one pissed up my icebox and one bloody stole my sons ball.
We moved twice and eventually gave up and went home

Why do people insist on taking dogs with them? Grrr annoyed!

LupeVelez Wed 24-Jul-13 17:18:14

This world is here for everyone, isn't it? Why should people have priority over other animals who mights also want to enjoy being alive?

stickingattwo Tue 23-Jul-13 20:03:01

People complaining about dogs on beaches. Why?

MrsDeVere Tue 23-Jul-13 18:10:24

dogs make a very small part of the crap (literal or otherwise) that is one our beaches and in our parks.

I don't know about other dog walkers but I suspect they do the same as I and pick up rubbish other people have left on their daily walks.

I can't walk past a bottle or can on a beach so I put it in a bag and bin it on my way home.

Dog crap is vile and can be highly dangerous but so are condoms, galss bottles, jagged tins and old bonfires and you are more likely to step on one one of them on a beach IME.

Scruffey Tue 23-Jul-13 17:50:32

I only use beaches where dogs are banned.

The last time I used one where they weren't banned, I walked in bare feet up to the sea to paddle and someone had let their dog shit right there. It was foul, I felt sick.

I love dogs but some owners don't realise they are ruining parks and beaches for thousands of people. I got a slide and swing set for my garden as the lovely local park has been shat all over. I never go there now.

SillyTilly123 Tue 23-Jul-13 17:46:45

Oh and I didnt know they were ahead as the path is windy.

SillyTilly123 Tue 23-Jul-13 17:44:05

I was walking my dog in a small forest type place today, very rarely see anyone there, and Tilly was doing her usual running ahead to explore then coming back. Anyhow I heard a little scream so I called her back, to which she came and there was a family there (about 4 adults,2kids- I didnt really look was trying to get tilly past them on her lead as the dad had shooed her away quite aggressivly so she was scared) and the 2 kids were practically shivering with fear (tilly had only ran past them, not bothering them) Its no way for the poor kids to live.

possum18 Tue 23-Jul-13 01:20:32

My Local beach has certain months (mainly summer) where dog and bicycle use is restricted to early morning and late afternoon - evening and this seems to work well. Some people choose to ignore but this is generally not an issue as long as owners are responsible and have control over their pets! If you can't control your doggies, put them on a lead

GummyLopes Mon 22-Jul-13 15:58:45

Dogs are alive and I think all alive animals should be able to run about and enjoy themselves the same as anyone else. Why should human's have the final say-so?

Absolutely spot on, MrsDeVere.

MrButtercat - if your child had a fear of water, would you abandon your attempts to help them overcome that fear and learn to swim? Or would you, rightly, think that this is a safety issue, and carry on until you had found something that worked for them, because that would be better than your child drowning?

What if you never tackle your child's fear of dogs, and they panic one day, run out into the road and are hit by a car? That is not catastrophising to scare you - MrsDeVere saw a child run into the road because they were scared of her dog - it was just good luck that there was no car coming past at the time.

As I said earlier, I think that a vet might not be the best person to tackle fear of dogs, because it is unlikely that they will have received the neccessary psychological training to deal with phobias (I doubt that is part of veterinary training), and as it si very likely that they love animals they may well struggle to understand a child who fears them.

I think you should find someone who deals with childrens' phobias, and get their help with this. It makes sense to help your child overcome this fear (not to make them feel crap, or to force them to do something - but to help them) because it would remove a major source of stress and distress from their life.

MrsDeVere Mon 22-Jul-13 14:08:17

A boy ran into the road rather than walk past my two small dogs who were on a lead. Its not the first time I have seen that. He was alone but i have seen kids ushered into the road by their parents ffs.

If my child was so frightened that he was willing to risk his life rather than be anywhere near a dog I would have to do something about it.

You just have to do whatever it takes or you are putting your child at huge risk.

That is not the same as me thinking it is the parent's fault (or the child's) they are scared. Its being realistic.

Dogs are everywhere and they always will be. Its like not bothering to teach your child how to cross the road safely because you disapprove of cars.

If my child had a phobia of sharks or parrots I could get away with perhaps not doing anything about it. But dogs, birds, buttons, trainers....

Its awful to see a child terrified of dogs. Its not the same as them not liking them. Not everyone has to like dogs.

Me too, Sarah. Applause, SarahandFuck.

SarahStrattonIsBackForJustABit Sun 21-Jul-13 20:42:27

I do 'Like' your post, Sarah. Full of common sense.

Awks Sun 21-Jul-13 20:42:01

You only go to beaches on "rare days out" and probably leave all your dirty litter behind I go every day with my dog.

SarahAndFuck Sun 21-Jul-13 20:39:15

SarahStratton we also have a little dog who people swoop on and pick up for a cuddle, even while he's on the lead. They seem to come from nowhere to pick him up, usually saying something about "Look! It's the smallest dog in the world!"

He is friendly, but he's also very young and still in training, and they don't know him. He's a JRT and a lot of people have taken pains to tell us how 'nasty' JRT's are. He's sociable, but he can still be frightened or hurt. He's actually very tolerant, enjoys being petted and has never growled or snapped at anyone.

I've also been bitten by a dog when I was a child. It was a friends dog, with an ear condition that had been neglected and not treated. Dog was in pain and my friend touched his ears, he jumped forward and bit me.

We've also been out with the dogs at a national trust property which welcomes them. It's basically a massive forest with fields and a lake. It's filled with dog walkers and mountain bikers. We went for lunch and chose to sit on a wall far away from the main cafe and picnic area to keep the dogs away from people who might not like them, especially while they were eating.

A family walked the length of a field to come and sit beside us and then complain loudly that we had a dog with us, their son was frightened of them and we should move away as it wasn't the sort of place to bring a dog. It's exactly the sort of place to bring a dog. And they had no need to come near us, there were plenty of tables, benches and other bits of wall much closer to the cafe and away from dogs.

I'm not sure what the point of the thread is really. The OP went to a dog friendly beach that is advertised as a dog friendly beach, lives locally to it and so must know it is a dog friendly beach and saw some inconsiderate people, which you get everywhere. And yes, they give a bad name to the good owners and good dogs, but calling for all dogs to be banned from the beach is not the answer.

No more so than calling for all people to be banned from the beach because some people litter it. I don't want to see people leave dog poo on the beach any more than I want them to leave bottles, cans, cigarette ends, plastic bags, dirty nappies, fast food wrappers and everything else that people leave on beaches. Some of which is just as bad and just as dangerous as dog poo.

Report the owners who are not cleaning up after their dogs. Take a sneaky photo if you can, or give a description. That's what I've done to a repeat offender (owner, not dog) I've seen on our street several times now. She has a German Shepherd dog she never cleans up after and after third time I confronted her and told her I was going to report her if I saw her again. And I have reported her.

But it doesn't mean the other dog owners who walk down our street and do clean up should be banned from it, it just means this one lazy, irresponsible madam needs to up her game and take care of her dog and it's mess.

I'd like to see more bins and more wardens issuing fines to people who are irresponsible, both with dogs and litter.

Oh I give up, I have made the photo tiny and still mumsnet won't upload it. Anyway it's a sweet photo of ex-terrified child cuddled up to the dog (retriever) on the sofa.

Bakingtins Sun 21-Jul-13 20:16:52

Plenty of beaches that don't allow dogs in the summer months if you don't like them. YABU.

SarahStrattonIsBackForJustABit Sun 21-Jul-13 20:16:14

According to one poster, upthread (please don't ask me who, I cba to find the post), dogs should have their future license number prominently displayed. So, number plates for dogs then? grin

Going to upload a pic to my profile of my previously terrified of dogs ds2 (and no dogs and boys wearing shoes aren't really allowed on the sofa - not even grotty sofas, but I took a photo before telling the pair of them to behave...)

A year before that photo was taken ds2 couldn't be in the same room as a dog - he was terrified.

McNewPants2013 Sun 21-Jul-13 20:11:53

I rarely go to the beach, this year I have been twice.

I don't see why local people should be banned from taking thier dogs to the beach which they use a far more than I do.

I do think that all owner should have pet insurance.

If licence fees was introduced how would it be policed.

We aren't saying force him, MrButtercat - but there are lots of dogs in the world (plus the fear of potential dogs round every corner) so I do not understand why you would give up on helping your child overcome the fear. Surely fear like this is very debilitating and limits his enjoyment of life - is worse in the long run than the stress of dealing with the fear?

It sounds as if it needs to be a very slow and gentle process for your child, and maybe you could find better help than the vet. To my mind, a vet is going to be someone who loves animals and is therefore not likely to understand, on a deep level, a fear of any animal, and is unlikely to have studies the psychology of phobias - you need a psychologist, maybe, rather than a vet.

Dackyduddles Sun 21-Jul-13 20:04:42

Cor.... You wouldn't like me. I ride horses. They shit wee gallop and play with footballs and swim.

SarahStrattonIsBackForJustABit Sun 21-Jul-13 20:01:49

But you do need to deal with it, like DD2 had to deal with her phobia, and sooner rather than later. What will he do when he wants to go round a friend's house, and they have dogs? Or when he's old enough to go out on his own, and comes face to face with dogs? I do feel for you, I know how awful it was for DD, but we can't let it interfere with their lives, for their sakes. sad

MrButtercat Sun 21-Jul-13 19:56:51

Said vet had well behaved dogs.It didn't work and forcing him makes it worse thanks.

SarahStrattonIsBackForJustABit Sun 21-Jul-13 19:52:59

A water pistol squirted striaght at the owners face usual sorts the problem.

You do that to me, and I'll have you done for assault. What a bloody stupid reaction.

SarahStrattonIsBackForJustABit Sun 21-Jul-13 19:48:59

Yep, I've had similar, including an arsey parent because LittleDog dared growl at the out of control, strange child who thought it would be ok to run after him, and pick him up, hurting him in the process. He really is tiny, and a bit fragile. Easy to hurt, poor thing.

MrB, I can't see how a vet could help, but spending time with a friend who has a well behaved dog would, as would asking if you could sit in on some dog training classes. Otherwise, your poor DS is going to find it really interferes with his social life.

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