To think parents should teach their children how to behave round dogs

(1000 Posts)
Xihha Fri 19-Jul-13 21:27:07

There have been a few posts lately about people needing to control their dogs more (and I agree, if you cant control our dog and clean up after it then you shouldn't have a dog imo), but is it unreasonable to expect parents to teach children to be a bit more careful round dogs?

Whilst walking my dog (on his lead) a child who looked about 10 ran up and stuck his head in my dogs face to make a fuss of him whilst i was picking up doggys poo, without checking if it was ok, there have been other times kids have just walked up and started pulling doggy around, this sort of thing happens a lot, especially in the summer when there are more kids out playing and the parents rarely say anything about it.

It's not really an issue with my great soppy lump of a dog because he loves kids and will put up with anything for a bit of fuss but shouldn't these kids know that you should check with the owners before approaching strange dogs and that even a nice dog can get pissed of if you start pulling it around?

wharrgarbl Fri 19-Jul-13 22:54:07

If the dog attacked, you'd seriously blame the child or parents?

It depends entirely on what (if anything) the child did to provoke the dog.
If the child grabbed the dog by the tail, or ears, or face, and got bitten, well, then they just learned you don't do that to (some) dogs.
My son learned very early to ask each owner 'is he gentle?' before approaching a dog.

Lazyjaney Fri 19-Jul-13 22:54:15

Fwiw I think the UK is the only country on earth where dogs are in general valued more than children.

babyhmummy01 Fri 19-Jul-13 22:58:27

lazyjaney its not about valuing a dog over a child. But if a dog is perfectly under control on a lead and is startled or hurt by an adult or child who runs up to fuss or play and snaps then it is the fault of the person who ran over not the dog owner. If the dog is not under control and runs up and attacks unprovoked then it is entirely the owners fault but that isn't what the OP was getting at

ShellyBoobs Fri 19-Jul-13 23:01:52

...well, then they just learned you don't do that to (some) dogs.

Ah that's ok then; they'll remember that lesson while they're in hospital having bits of face sewn back on.

I didn't think of it positively like that.

babyhmummy01 Fri 19-Jul-13 23:03:55

shellyboobs you are being very unreasonable here! If a child or adult attacks a dog they will defend themselves...it remains the fault of the child or adult not the dog or the owner

MintyChops Fri 19-Jul-13 23:05:35

Oh well Shelly, seems like you didn't quite get what the OP was asking......

Children should learn how to interact with dogs because like it or not, dogs are a normal part of life and they WILL come across them whether you like it or not. It's safer for them to know what to do.

Sleep404 Fri 19-Jul-13 23:07:00

Children like animals are unpredictable. But children can't do the sort of damage that dogs can, so yes the onus needs to be on the dog owner.
Also majority of the recent stories where children were mauled by dogs, were not by dogs on leads, but overwhelming by dogs whose owners thought they were nice well behaved dogs. Not sure i would blame the child in any of those cases.

I've been bitten by a dog twice. Once when I lived abroad and someone taunted the dog while I was walking him. I wouldn't let go when he went for her so he bit me instead. And the second time was here, when the neighbours in a block of flats left their front door open, I walked past on the landing and ended up with their dog hanging off my arm. I had to throw it up the stairs to get it off me.
Both times the owners were at fault. In the first instance I knew my dog was aggressive, or rather my mum and dad did and he should have been muzzled and the second speaks for itself.

Lazyjaney Fri 19-Jul-13 23:08:23

Sorry, I see any dog as a potentially dangerous thing that some people choose to take around with them, despite the risk to others. If it bites my child in a public place where my child has a perfectly good right to be, it's your fault for choosing to carry it and I'll have your hide and your dog's too.

wharrgarbl Fri 19-Jul-13 23:08:57

Shellyboobs, exactly why do you think it should be perfectly acceptable and reasonable for children to be permitted to visit any amount of abuse on an animal without repercussions?

babyhmummy01 Fri 19-Jul-13 23:09:56

sleep404 you have missed the point I think. The OP is talking about a dog on a lead and under control and a child who didn't know the dog running up and shoving its face in the dogs face. The child is at fault or rather the parents are not the dog owner.

FreyaSnow Fri 19-Jul-13 23:10:42

I think that responsible parents teach their children how to behave in any common situation where there is a potential danger. I wouldn't decide to not bother teaching children to leave broken glass in the street alone on the basis that people shouldn't smash glass.

babyhmummy01 Fri 19-Jul-13 23:11:24

lazyjaney and if its as a result of u or ur child hurting my well controlled dog I will have yours quite frankly

wharrgarbl Fri 19-Jul-13 23:11:38

And I absolutely support people being in control of their animals at all times - on a lead (not those bloody stupid extending ones), or properly trained to respond to commands.
A friend of mine has an Akita - a dog bred to hunt bear in Japan. She once accidentally picked up chocolate, and without thinking, I grabbed her muzzle, and pulled it out. She didn't even close her mouth on my hand. Because she is a properly trained dog, with good manners.

Numberlock Fri 19-Jul-13 23:12:00

Christ almighty this is all a joke right? Dead kid = oh well they should have known better.

babyhmummy01 Fri 19-Jul-13 23:12:33

freyasnow exactly!

Numberlock Fri 19-Jul-13 23:13:13

Shellyboobs, exactly why do you think it should be perfectly acceptable and reasonable for children to be permitted to visit any amount of abuse on an animal without repercussions?

Those repercussions being severe injuries or worse?

Where did shelleyboobs say that a child should be permitted to visit any amount of abuse on an animal without repercussions? I must have missed that! I read her post, as the owner of a dog has a responsibiltiy to ensure that their dog is taught not to attack a child who approaches suddenly. Seems perfectly reasonable to me.

MintyChops Fri 19-Jul-13 23:15:02

Well said Freyasnow.

WhistlingNun Fri 19-Jul-13 23:15:29

I think if you know your dog snaps/can be unpredictable/has ever bitten before/shown any threatening behavior - it's your responsibility to ensure your dog is muzzled when out in public.

My 5yo dd is aware that she should only touch dogs if they are with an owner, and that the owner has given permission.

We were actually thanked the other day for doing this. The woman with the dog said that her old dog used to be snappy and kids were forever in its face without asking.

My dd used to be terrified of dogs. She seems to have snapped out of it a lot though on her own. She now wants us to get a puppy!

Numberlock Fri 19-Jul-13 23:17:49

Sorry, I see any dog as a potentially dangerous thing that some people choose to take around with them, despite the risk to others. If it bites my child in a public place where my child has a perfectly good right to be, it's your fault for choosing to carry it and I'll have your hide and your dog's too.

Here here except I'd replace the word dog with shit machine.

babyhmummy01 Fri 19-Jul-13 23:17:53

whistlingnun any dog will attack if threatened or hurt, its a natural defense. They don't need to have ever shown any aggressive behaviour previously.

Sleep404 Fri 19-Jul-13 23:17:54

Because children are unpredictable and will not always do what they are taught and it is unreasonable to believe they will.

I teach my dd not to do lots of stuff, which given her age she has trouble remembering all of the time.

FreyaSnow Fri 19-Jul-13 23:17:55

I suppose the equivalent to some of these examples would be that if I was having a picnic in the park and had a glass bottle and a child ran up and threw the bottle in the air, smashed it and then injured themselves on the glass, I would think that the child's right to be in the park did not extend to touching my property. The same would apply if they went up to somebody else's dog and put their fingers on its eyes, face etc.

wharrgarbl Fri 19-Jul-13 23:18:40

I said this: If the child grabbed the dog by the tail, or ears, or face, and got bitten, well, then they just learned you don't do that to (some) dogs.

So she resorted to some hyperbole and said this Ah that's ok then; they'll remember that lesson while they're in hospital having bits of face sewn back on.

Difference being dog provoked->dog bite, or unprovoked dog attack.
Do you train your children not to walk into traffic? Simialr thing.

Sure, and children should be taught to not attack dogs they don't know.

Christ almighty this is all a joke right? Dead kid = oh well they should have known better.

In rhetoric, this is called a straw man argument. Of course yes, I'm advocating the death of children. I'm all funny like that. hmm

Lazyjaney Fri 19-Jul-13 23:18:54

Lazyjaney and if its as a result of u or ur child hurting my well controlled dog I will have yours quite frankly

Unlikely - even in the UK, the law favours bitten kids over biting dogs.

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