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having time off work due to heat?

(191 Posts)
IneedAyoniNickname Thu 18-Jul-13 23:36:59

I've seen a couple of things on facebook, saying that they (the govt) are considering allowing people in non.essential jobs to not have to go to work if temperatures reach 30 degrees or more.

The people that have posted about it all work in essential jobs, mainly care work. They were all of the opinion that if they have to work, everyone does. Ans part of me agrees.

BUT, surely they chose to have that career, knowing they didn't get time of for Christmas/Easter/bank holidays/extreme weather.

So what do mners think? Should people be able to stay at home, particularly those who work in un air conditioned places, in non essential roles?

What about young school children? Ds2 was actually sick. with the heat, so has had to stay off school for the last day and a half of term. Mum also suffers badly with heat, and occasionally passes. This is despite drinking plenty and avoiding sun.

Btw, my career plan is nursing, if I get into uni next year. I'm going into it knowing I'll have to manage in all extremes of weather.

valiumredhead Thu 25-Jul-13 20:21:37

Dark, do they not have the clip things at the side so they can open up fully? That's what we have, they're easy to miss.

Ilovemyself Thu 25-Jul-13 20:05:57

Oh Lupa. I have never said I don't care about employee rights. Just that employees need to share the burden.

Like I said, you don't give a monkeys about those that have to work in it all year round, just those office staff that almost certainly have the chance to get up, have a drink, and move around a lot more than some.

Darkesteyes Thu 25-Jul-13 14:51:14

Having to bring spare clothes with you shows how ridiculous it is.

Darkesteyes Thu 25-Jul-13 14:50:09

Lupa i share your pain. I live in an HA flat. Back in 2004 they put new windows in and because of H and S they only open an inch.
I prefer the winter too. I love my punchy coloured winter coats. I do style much better in winter.
Definately a winter/Christmas girl me.

Lupamonkey Thu 25-Jul-13 14:19:31

I did answer your question Ilovemyself, I said it's not for me to work that out. They have a legal minimum temperature and yet people work in refridgerated units. Whatever provisions are in place for those businesses, then this can be used for those working at the other end of the thermometer.

I blame your attitude of not caring less about the employees' health and welfare which call for these rules in the first place.

I had to spend 10 minutes drying out my sweaty clothes this morning after working in a particularly wretched hot filing room. Luckily I had brought a spare of undies with me. Maybe that 10 minutes ought to be docked out of my pay? I've more of that shite to look forward to after lunch. Lucky me, can't wait until I pass out.

Ilovemyself Thu 25-Jul-13 13:49:54

Ok Lupa. You haven't answered the question about places of hot work. How can they introduce a law when in some cases it would be impossible to get the temperature below 30c. Foundries, glass blowing, many kitchens. They are all places where the law if made cannot work.

And yes the everybody out mentality is still there with your comment that employers will start to do their bit once the law changes. And some companies will be really screwed. Small companies that cannot afford even a small investment. But the I'm alright brigade won't care as the big bad employer will be held to book.

Lupamonkey Thu 25-Jul-13 13:20:04

Not to worry folks, no-one's going to shout "Everybody out" or the country grind to a halt, cos once they make the max temperature law, employers will do the right thing and cool down their workplaces. They are all lovely caring and considerate employers who realise that a happy team is a productive team. Simples wink

I for one do not take holidays in hot countries (not that I can afford to take holidays). Norway sounds quite nice right now. I'm definately a winter person.

Crinkle77 Thu 25-Jul-13 12:12:30

I think it is a load of nonsense myself but it also depends on what you class as essential. The country can't grind to a halt because it is hot. It is essential to the business owner that things get done otherwise they might not be able to pay wages to the staff. I think people would moan then wouldn't they?

KellyElly Thu 25-Jul-13 11:35:53

BoneyBackJefferson Hence why I don't work in management of schools. As I keep saying it's down to the individual school. Yes, it's a discussion forum but jumping on a point where someone says schools need a contingency plan when very young children are getting heat stroke seems a bit argumentative to be fair. I did not at any point say I had the solutions.

BoneyBackJefferson Thu 25-Jul-13 10:52:40

KellyElly
"I'm not quite sure why you are trying to argue the points with me."

Its a discussion forum its what we do on them.

"When very young children are being sick from the temperature in a school something has to be done about it."

I agree but the suggestions you made would not work, Its very easy to say that something should be done but it has to be a workable solution.

KellyElly Thu 25-Jul-13 10:24:53

BoneyBackJefferson As I said, it's down to the individual school. I'm not quite sure why you are trying to argue the points with me. If a young child got seriously ill because of heat stroke the 'lazy teacher comments', 'lack of funding' etc would all be irrelevant really. When very young children are being sick from the temperature in a school something has to be done about it.

SuffolkNWhat Thu 25-Jul-13 09:41:05

Trust me a 32 degree classroom, with 30 sweaty teenagers, windows that only open a crack and being six months pregnant is no joke.

No fans, only 1 room with A/C (ICT suite), I passed out from the heat a couple of times despite wearing light clothing, drinking lots and using ice packs to try and cool me down.

It's the nature of the heat, it's not a dry heat you get in sunnier climes popular with holiday makers, it's sticky, humid and there has been a distinct lack of breeze. We have had children off with heat stroke, being sick in school and at the point of collapse.

I'm thinking of moving to Norway if this becomes the norm for our summers, unless there is a massive overhaul of how schools deal with the heat (hollow laugh)

MadeOfStarDust Thu 25-Jul-13 09:31:02

and we go to hotter countries in the summer ON HOLIDAY...

anyone care to join me - was crawling round roof spaces last week rewiring a house.... it was hot - BEYOND belief hot - so hot the sweat was running down my face and dribbling off my chin - that hot...

strangely enough I do not want to do that too often...

Altinkum Thu 25-Jul-13 09:01:15

Because you have breeze, air con, a chance to go somewhere else to cool down, get a drink.

The heat abroad is NOTHING like this heat, I'm asthmatic, I'm finding it hard to breathe as the air is so thick, it's humid, sticky, and leaves you feeling exhausted, and that's just the normal air, then double that with industrial ovens, hot plates, etc....

The UK heat is nothing like te heat abroad.

MadeOfStarDust Thu 25-Jul-13 08:59:30

Some of us choose not to do holiday in the sun because it would be our idea of hell...

FasterStronger Thu 25-Jul-13 08:49:29

if above 30 degrees is so unpleasant, why do people go to hotter countries in the summer? and frequently lie in the sun...?

Altinkum Thu 25-Jul-13 08:10:55

I'm all for this, having suffered from heat exhaustion for te past two days, due to working in 33c heat and having mini panick attacks has been absolute hell.

I work in a extremely busy cafe/rest with no air con, (as they use too much electricity for what they have so are constantly going into power cuts) this week I've been I'll after shifts, and also passed out, and that's not just me a few other members of stuff have done so also.

This will be more than welcome in our work place.

Ilovemyself Thu 25-Jul-13 06:53:27

Extremepie. It seems that it is only those that work in an office that are complaining as they have no answer for other environments. That figures.

And yes, I do work in an office.

extremepie Wed 24-Jul-13 23:38:50

So what should an employer of people who work in kitchens do to make for a more comfortable working environment?

Ilovemyself Wed 24-Jul-13 23:35:27

Lupa. Too many people are using the temperature as a reason to want to go home. And as an employee you have an equal responsibility to look after your own safety.

You sound just like the union leaders of the 70's who ruined this once great country.

Everybody out.................

Lupamonkey Wed 24-Jul-13 23:32:01

Ilovemyself, that flippant remark was a little presumptuous of you to say the least. I don't have an attitude, nor am I 'work shy'. I look out for workers' welfare. Too many employers are irresponsible and shirk their duty of care.

And I don't intend to deal with those whose work is hot by it's very nature. It is up to the employer to make sure their workers do not collapse from heat so that they can make a profit.

ArgyMargy compassion should be shown to those who are suffering through neglect. It's about priorities.

ArgyMargy Wed 24-Jul-13 22:56:34

What Ilovemyself said, absolutely. And I have compassion in spades, for those who need it.

Ilovemyself Wed 24-Jul-13 22:32:08

BTW Lupa. How do you propose you deal with those whose work is hot by its very nature? Or do you think that only office workers deserve this?

valiumredhead Wed 24-Jul-13 22:26:32

I agree lupa.

Exactly the same as if the work place was freezing in the winter due to no heating. There would be uproar.

Ilovemyself Wed 24-Jul-13 22:13:28

Lupamonkey. Your attitude shows just what is wrong with work shy Brits today

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