to make a huge fuss about 36 celcius in office?

(91 Posts)
50BalesOfHay Mon 08-Jul-13 21:44:55

Just that really. It's horrid, I could hardly breathe. No window, fam just stirs the soupy air. I'm late menopausal so struggle with heat anyway, but I just can't cope with it. Wibu to insist that work hire an air con unit, or I won't work there?

There must be health & safety guidelines somewhere with the maximum acceptable temperature.

Yanbu but I don't think there are any laws or anything you can call on, as some people eg chefs just have to take it. Could you work from home?

WhoNickedMyName Mon 08-Jul-13 21:50:43

There's a minimum acceptable temperature but no max.

No harm in asking for a move to a better ventilated area or for one of those cheap air con units... The worst they can say is no.

EndoplasmicReticulum Mon 08-Jul-13 21:50:45

I'm not sure if this is correct, but I don't think there's a maximum acceptable temperature. There is a minimum one.

notapizzaeater Mon 08-Jul-13 21:51:08

There isn't a maximum just a minimum - its muggy everywhere at the mo, we are just not geared up for any weather in the uk, flood, snow, heat

Try www.hse.gov.uk

fuckwittery Mon 08-Jul-13 21:52:04

link here, no maximum temperature, but all reasonable steps should be taken to make it an acceptable temperature
36 degrees is definitely not acceptable!

www.hse.gov.uk/contact/faqs/temperature.htm

Quangle Mon 08-Jul-13 21:52:11

That's awful. Do you work in a tin box or something?

I would request that something be done about it. There may not be rules about it but it's clearly not appropriate for normal office work.

sonlypuppyfat Mon 08-Jul-13 21:55:38

My husband is a welder I'll tell him how hot you are in your office!

nicelyneurotic Mon 08-Jul-13 21:57:06

I think the hse recommends 19-24 degrees? But I don't think there's a legal limit. Do complain though. This happened in an office I worked in (for months!) and a pregnant lady had to go home with chest pains she was feeling so ill. Can you work from home? Or get signed off sick with your menopausal symptoms until it gets cooler?

FirstVix Mon 08-Jul-13 22:00:32

My classroom got to 36 degrees today before any students even entered! I was once OFSTEDed in those temps.
I've looked and looked before and there's no max temp mentioned (specifically). Must be too rare to need legislation.

pleiadianpony Mon 08-Jul-13 22:06:08

TUC guidelines state anything above 30 degrees is unreasonable. We looked it up in our office today. Unfortunately we weren’t hot enough to justify going home early!

suchawimp Mon 08-Jul-13 22:12:52

Same as the office I work in - windows don't open and air con wasn't working.

Was v hot.

apostropheuse Mon 08-Jul-13 22:18:06

My office was unbearable today too. Top floor, two large windows and it's a glass building to boot.

I have the blinds closed all day and a fan on my desk but it's still stifling hot.

50BalesOfHay Mon 08-Jul-13 22:23:29

Not just me then. I'm going to refuse to work in it and involve the union may go sick if not sorted

SodaStreamy Mon 08-Jul-13 22:27:13

could you sit with your feet in a basin of ice water?

GreenShadow Mon 08-Jul-13 22:33:14

I can only dream of a warm office.
Ours has a tiny window and doesn't get the sun, so rarely warms up. I have to take a jumper in to put on in the office while others are enjoying the sun outside.

specialsubject Mon 08-Jul-13 22:42:57

fuss by all means, but there's no legal maximum in UK law. Fuckwit architects keep designing office buildings with no windows and useless aircon, then fill them with computers. Hence they overheat.

been going on for years. Sorry.

WhoNickedMyName Mon 08-Jul-13 22:58:44

What's the point in going in all guns blazing, refusing to work and with threats of unions and sick leave? You're just going to put your bosses back up from the off.

Go in to your boss and calmly make a reasonable request. Explain that it reached 36 degrees today. Ask them to come and sit in your office for 5 minutes to experience the heat. Then based on their response, take it from there. Offer solutions... An office move, air con, working from home.

If you go in 'refusing to work' then you might as well just save yourself the bother and resign.

nokidshere Mon 08-Jul-13 23:02:44

Although there is no maximum temperature outlined in H&S Legislation research has shown that temps in excess of around 75 degrees reduce peoples ability to work effectively. 36c would be totally unacceptable for any length of time and could be construed as an offence under the employers general duty to their employees under section 2 of H&SWA 1974. And there must be a thermometer!

Go and tell your manager the above.

(info given by DH who is H&S Officer) Hope this helps

50BalesOfHay Mon 08-Jul-13 23:14:07

They know its a problem in that office. They accept they need to get aircon. They need to be bothered. Only a big fuss will make it happen.

sashh Tue 09-Jul-13 05:55:14

There must be health & safety guidelines somewhere with the maximum acceptable temperature.

There isn't for people (there is a min) but there is for computers. OP look up the health and safety at work act (DSE regulations). Could you do your work with the computers all switched off? And as the regulation is ot just computers but any 'display screen equipment' it covers things like CCTV.

MidniteScribbler Tue 09-Jul-13 06:04:35

Small desk fan blowing across a shallow bowl of cold water. Instant airconditioning.

PaulInHolland Tue 09-Jul-13 06:53:38

Many years ago I worked in a building with lots of glass where you could not open any windows.The airco was being repaired and the temporary system broke down in the middle of summer.temperatures in the office reached 30 degrees.as union branch secretary we complained to management and they did nothing.so one day we had a 1 day unofficial strike. The next day the temporary airco was fixed.

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