to be pissed off with these parents who BUY under age kids booze for parties?

(132 Posts)
EliotNess Sun 30-Jun-13 10:23:56

who the fuck are they? S1 goes to a party, he is 14 almost 15. Who buys annabel frigging 48 cans of lager?
I don't feed my kid lager. It is against the law to buy alcohol for under 16s and it is also bloody irresponsible.

the whole french watered down wine mantra has been proven to be a hug middle class fallacy and this condoning of drinking yet ranting about Booze britain is starting to get on me tits

wonderingsoul Sun 30-Jun-13 10:41:23

greenkit.
i think you are, if you ban her it will lead to more rebeling i think and more screacy.

i think the most important thing is drill home is, drinking can be fun, done safe. you dont have to get balwing drunk and pass out. also liek the other op said. to call if s ome one is in need of help no matter what trouble you think your get into.

EliotNess Sun 30-Jun-13 10:41:38

we have a good relationship with s1 - no shouting or I hate you, or anything. He is very calm and gets it.
We have imposed a minor sanction that will inconvenience him,

OctopusPete8 Sun 30-Jun-13 10:41:42

48 cans is mental, you'll have a lot of spewing kids I bet.

Dawndonna Sun 30-Jun-13 10:42:48

Just as a point to some. 16 is the legal age in Germany, Austria, Belgium, The Netherlands, to name a few.

MoominsYonisAreScary Sun 30-Jun-13 10:42:50

When we were young there was a couple of places who sold booze to us, ds1 is 18 now and could have pssed for 18 for the last few years but wasn't able to find anywhere that would sell it to him without Id.

That takes me back, 20 /20, thunderbird and diamond White on the cricket field of a Friday night

EliotNess Sun 30-Jun-13 10:42:51

Help - its odd isnt it. I drink. I have parties, i am not some kind of Amish mother. But I cannot risk being responsible for a kid being hospitalised on my watch , so if we did have a party for CHILDREN ( which tbh I never would) there would be no booze and the whole thing would be a disaster from their regard

EliotNess Sun 30-Jun-13 10:43:33

One of the other kids there was getting a tax home - presumably so he can sneak in and not do the drunk walk!

EliotNess Sun 30-Jun-13 10:44:01

I might let him have a small beer on holiday maybe. MAYBE. LOrd I dunno.

Floppityflop Sun 30-Jun-13 10:44:29

I think it is legal to serve alcohol to children over the age of 5 in private premises. I haven't looked into it but that suggests that an over-18 would have to be serving the drinks (I.e., you can't buy your 16-year old a load of tinnies and leave them alone).

Restaurant beer, wine and cider okay with meal if 16 or over and accompanied by adult. No spirits.

"Plus he is PFB - i KNOW we will be cooler for the next kids"

Nothing cooler than an early start on the cirrhosis. You are doing the RIGHT THING

Bowlersarm Sun 30-Jun-13 10:46:07

greenkit it seems to be the regularity which is a problem, if it is every Friday. I would say it's fairly naive if people don't expect their 16 year olds to start experimenting with alcohol, but she is drinking very frequently. Not sure what you should do about it though. Tricky.

My DS1, 17, is sporty thank god, so will only drink occasionally. My 15 year old isn't interested in girls/parties yet. At the moment we don't have any alcohol issues, but it must be tough if you do with your teens.

Greenkit Sun 30-Jun-13 10:46:40

She is my second girl, so I have been there before smile it is hard to get the balance. I wouldnt be happy with crates of drink at a party for young people, but a few drinks is ok, for over 16s, not 14.

My lad 15 isnt into drinking yet, which is good, i have that yet to come smile

Floppity, doesn't also have to be a parent? No idea how you'd check for sure but I suppose it's to stop a mixed group of 18, 17 and 16yos getting drunk in a restaurant, with one barely 18yo "in charge".

Floppityflop Sun 30-Jun-13 10:46:49

Sorry, I mean 5 or over. But while it may be legal it's not necessarily advisable!

EliotNess Sun 30-Jun-13 10:47:26

Polar, its funny as s2 is growing a lot atm and also getting sleepier and more disorganised. We can recongise the signs this time of adolescence, with s1 we just got cross!

No, you do have to be older than 5 to get a glass of wine in a restuarnt with a meal. Not sure what the age is but it is 12+

EliotNess Sun 30-Jun-13 10:48:14

to be honest the precise legality doesnt interest me. Its just wrong in my eyes.

meditrina Sun 30-Jun-13 10:48:26

I'm thinking 16ish because at 18 they can buy alcohol for themselves and I'd like a shot at instilling some drink awareness in the run up to that.

Floppityflop Sun 30-Jun-13 10:48:38

StealthPolarBear, I will have to find out now! Probably just an adult as would be hard to enforce otherwise. Licensee should not serve if people getting intoxicated - often forgotten.

www.adviceguide.org.uk/england/relationships_e/faq_index_family/faq_family_legal_age_drinking_and_smoking.htm
Oh it is 16. But it does just say you have to be with an over 18 - no mention of parent,

Floppityflop Sun 30-Jun-13 10:49:21

It is 16 or over in restaurant and 5 in private premises. Sorry for confusion!

Greenkit Sun 30-Jun-13 10:49:23

Bowlersarm She will go to her mates say two/three times month or so, I dont think they drink every time. Its more that they have spirits rather than lager. I have as above, explained about different sizes, drinking too fast, etc

She is quite sensible, but its still a little scary

EliotNess Sun 30-Jun-13 10:49:54

and you think Greeny, dont you, that you will find it clear. But there are so many shades of grey

Floppity I assumed it would be one of those "reasonable" judgements. So 16 year old in restaurant with middle aged person/couple, can reasonably serve them even if it turns out they are aunt/uncle not parent.
but mixed group of 16/17/18 year olds, obviously no parent - so no!

raisah Sun 30-Jun-13 10:51:51

An anonymous call to the police should nip this madness in the bud.
If the parent thinks she is mature enough to provide alcohol for underage teens then she is responsible enough to take the consequences.

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