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To GPS my cat and go and speak to the neighbour?

(151 Posts)
LongGoneBeforeDaylight Fri 14-Jun-13 14:12:15

I own a very large ginger Tom cat. He is supposed to be on a diet but comes home licking his lips and smelling of food. And also, often,
cigarette smoke grin
I bought a "cat nav" device for him (v small USB thing which attaches to his collar). I have used it three times now and downloaded the data and it shows him going into a house about 8 doors down and not moving for an hour.

AIBU to go and speak to them and ask them to stop feeding him? I wasn't planning on telling them about the GPS device... grin

Or would you leave it?

I am aware this post reads like I am a mad woman, btw. I promise I am sane. I just can't bear the patronising vet telling me he will get type 2 diabetes if he doesn't lost weight hmm

msrisotto Fri 14-Jun-13 14:15:13

I love you for GPS tracking your cat grin
Sure go and speak to them. However, he is likely to find food elsewhere! You can get collars like this which might help with greedy cats

quoteunquote Fri 14-Jun-13 14:15:29

A polite letter maybe asking them not to feed him as he is on special food, prescribed by vet for an expensive medical condition.

Where did you get your cat nav device grin].

I have to have one for my boy.

That was supposed to be a grin.

quoteunquote Fri 14-Jun-13 14:18:46

those collars are great,

My friend's parents have a country pub, all four of their very laid back dogs have homemade signs on their necks with do not feed on.

LookingThroughTheFog Fri 14-Jun-13 14:19:47

It's possible that your neighbour is just feeding her own cat, and your cat's coming into steal the food.

bonzo77 Fri 14-Jun-13 14:22:20

Yanbu. I've got a tag on the collar saying "on vets diet do not feed". I'd speak to the neighbour and explain that the cat has a condition, needs expensive food in precisely measured portions. Say you gps'ed the cat as you worry about its health (so they know you've rumbled them).

Does that cat visit them at a particular time? I'd keep it at these times.

Off to google cat GPS!

LisaMed Fri 14-Jun-13 14:35:19

the vet we used to take evil cat to had a resident cat which knew when all the grocery deliveries were in the area and was very good at mooching. They had a collar made saying 'I am fat, do not feed me'.

Said cat broke into their storeroom and started work on a huge sack of kitten food. It sits on the reception counter and intimidates large alsatians and rottweilers. And as for the cat that used to live three doors down which used to hang around the pizza shop at closing time to scrounge off the pizza buying drunks...

I suggest the collar and a resigned attitude. Also speak to the neighbour and say that there are weight issues so perhaps they could try low calorie treats.

LongGoneBeforeDaylight Fri 14-Jun-13 14:37:53

I think a note may be the better way forward grin especially if I might accidentally drop my cat in it if he is stealing!!

I got it from g-paws.com... More money than sense I know hmm

A small part of me really wants to go over there now and speak to them and report back!

Maybe it is just breaking in and scoffing their own cats food. If we didn't have a microchip cat flap then I'd be feeding half the street given hown many cat faces we get squashed up against the flap grin

limitedperiodonly Fri 14-Jun-13 14:41:21

I am fat. Do not feed me grin

msrisotto Fri 14-Jun-13 14:43:35

I am fat. Do not feed me grin Aww poor humiliated mog!

LongGoneBeforeDaylight Fri 14-Jun-13 14:51:00

Mumsnet. I went over there. It wasn't good.

Oh dear, come on , spill!

And.... Type faster mad cat lady

LongGoneBeforeDaylight Fri 14-Jun-13 14:58:07

blushes

I went over there... (I am off sick at the moment in my defence and going crazy. I have already had some fun this morning baiting a PPI caller (I'm a lawyer))... and he was IN THEIR HOUSE. Lounging on their sofa looking v at home.

I said, a little abruptly, 'er... he's mine' because I was quite shocked at seeing him on their sofa and she was basically very cool with me and said he is there almost half the time and she thinks he is hungry angry and meows at her to feed him. Wanted to say 'stop farking letting him in then' but turned around and left sad

With the cat I hope.

msrisotto Fri 14-Jun-13 15:11:45

Oh cripes. Erm, is that all that was said? I'd def get a collar with do not feed - diabetic or something.

LongGoneBeforeDaylight Fri 14-Jun-13 15:13:00

Collar sounds like a good plan. What a cow. Beginning to wonder if he is her cat and he is only visiting me!

msrisotto Fri 14-Jun-13 15:15:14

Well yes cats do select their owners rather than the other way round. However, did you see the thread recently where someone retrieved their cat after getting the police involved? That was a bit mad but they had tried rational discussion with the cat napping neighbour.

LittleFeileFooFoo Fri 14-Jun-13 15:15:41

Maybe try keeping him in for a while?

LongGoneBeforeDaylight Fri 14-Jun-13 15:17:52

Blimey. He is in with me all night so I figure he is mine! I can't keep him in during the day... He goes mental, scratching at the door and whingeing mostly. Plus he needs any exercise he can get! grin

Justfornowitwilldo Fri 14-Jun-13 15:20:24

Stick a very politely worded letter through the door (keep a copy) to say that he is on a vet prescribed diet because his weight is causing health complications and could she please stop feeding him as it endangers his health.

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