to show my support for the Armed Forces

(215 Posts)
CuntPuffin Thu 23-May-13 11:52:12

Following yesterday's atrocious incident, I chose to wear a Help for Heroes shirt today. I have just been told off by a colleague, saying it was insensitive and inappropriate.

Bearing in mind I am ex-force as is my husband, I disagree and am proud to show my support for our Armed Forces. And told him this in fairly clear words.

Have I got this really wrong, or has he?

StillSeekingSpike Thu 23-May-13 13:03:25

Ilovemyself- supporting our armed forces because they are 'only following orders' sounds a bit like the Nuremberg defence [shocked]

You might have worn it to work before, but today, there is a sensitive situation, that needs careful handling, happening, that is why the COBRA meeting has taken place.

Public statements have had to be made from varioyus organisations.

As a member of your companies diversity forum, you should be well aware of the possible connotations of you wearning the t-shirt and why is not the time for any actions that can be mis-construed or used by those following a anti-social agenda.

cherryade8 Thu 23-May-13 13:07:44

Yanbu. Wear it with pride.

NeedSomeSun142 Thu 23-May-13 13:11:11

I didn't think Help for Heroes was a 'political statement' I thought is was a charity?

HeySoulSister Thu 23-May-13 13:13:00

I don't see how its a political statement either

CuntPuffin Thu 23-May-13 13:17:29

I am not a member of COBRA or making a public statement. hmm

It is a top with a small logo on it. I have never met anyone who uses H4H as a political statement in the way that has been suggested here.

Oh well. I am now going to leave this thread as it seems that what to me was a simple act of thought for the young man, his family and friends has been completely misunderstood.

It's a political statement because it is expressing support for a particular group and, implicitly, a particular set of values.

Wearing a breast cancer ribbon is hardly a political statement, because no-one believes that it's a good thing to die of cancer.

Wearing an anti-abortion (or pro-life) symbol is a political statement, because there is disagreement over the issue.

Same thing here, IMO.

However, I think if the OP has worn this shirt before and no-one complained, she might email this bloke and explain gently that this is a cause she has supported for a long time, she's worn the shirt to work often before, and she was surprised by his comments. That will give him a chance to think through his reaction.

I can see the argument for all political statements being inappropriate at work, but I also reckon if thugs are wearing these shirts, it is a good thing that someone like the OP, who supported the cause before all of this, is demonstrating that these thugs are co-opting the charity, and the charity itself is still exactly what it always was, a source of support.

Sorry, I cross posted, I wasn't randomly talking about you in the third person.

FoofFighter Thu 23-May-13 13:19:53

I don't think YWBU but I can see how someone might think it was, just as the St George cross has been hi-jacked by people such as the EDL for extremist reasons, I can see that the whole forces support, H4H wearing can/will/has already been too. Not a reason to not wear one yourself of course but worth bearing in mind if you don't want to be tarred with the same brush.

BTW anyone wanting to donate some money - Help for Heroes isn't the only charity (especially if people cannot get through) there is also the Army Benevolent Fund http://www.soldierscharity.org/

specialsubject Thu 23-May-13 13:21:19

all those whining about defence budgets and the military - check your family history. Unless you are 100% white European, you would not have existed if things had gone differently in WWII, because your parents would have been gassed and you would never have been born.

the enemy is now different - but it is the military that stops something similar happening again. While there are some conflicts in which it is maybe unwise to be involved, that is the big picture.

Crowler Thu 23-May-13 13:22:18

It's moderately political.

There are a lot of people who don't agree with enlisting in the armed forces given how disastrous the UK's involvement has been in Iraq/Afghanistan, etc. As long as there's no draft, the soldiers are making a choice to get involved in this endeavour.

We're a long way off from an armed forces that merely protects our borders. That's why it's political.

threesypeesy Thu 23-May-13 13:22:57

YANBU wear it with pride and a symbol of solidarity that our country will not be beaten by terrorists

Personally who ever said anything negative against it is a twat!!

I think our troops should be supported all the time after all these men and women do for or country they are true heros.

Ilovemyself Thu 23-May-13 13:23:42

Stillseekingspike - we live in a democracy and we are able to speak our minds - unlike Nazi germany. And we can vote for someone who will take our troops out of the situation. ( if the party existed!)

As someone with family in the forces, I see no reason why we cannot support our forces as they would be there to lay their lives on the line to protect civilians in the UK if we needed it.

Saltire Thu 23-May-13 13:24:20

There is also the Royal naval benevolent fund
here,
the RAF Beneveolent fund here,
as well as charities such as Royal british legion (and RBL Scotland)and SSAFFA,

Crowler Thu 23-May-13 13:25:11

Yes, anyone who criticizes the military is a twat. Another brilliant observation from threesypeesy.

SkylerWhite Thu 23-May-13 13:25:38

Oh dear. This thread has taken turn down a Godwin's Law cul-de-sac.

all those whining about defence budgets and the military - check your family history. Unless you are 100% white European, you would not have existed if things had gone differently in WWII, because your parents would have been gassed and you would never have been born.

I'm sorry, but what an absolute pile of horseshit.

Check your basic history of WWII and a map.

You have no idea what might have happened in WWII, and especially, you have no idea whether, had we not got into WWI, the whole thing might not have happened.

I find it really disrespectful to bring the Holocaust into a discussion like this.

Crowler Thu 23-May-13 13:28:21

As someone with family in the forces, I see no reason why we cannot support our forces as they would be there to lay their lives on the line to protect civilians in the UK if we needed it.

You'd have to be a moron to not support this. What people don't support is the misadventures in the middle-east, which are decidedly dangerous for the people of the UK (not to mention the poor sods over there).

WilsonFrickett Thu 23-May-13 13:29:39

If you are a member of your company's diversity forum then you should be aware of how you are presenting yourself. What if a Muslim member of staff had been subject to bullying comments today and wanted to talk to you about it as a member of the diversity forum? Rightly or wrongly, s/he would form an opinion about your opinions about yesterday from the shirt you're wearing.

I absolutely get that you have worn the top previously with no problems, but I think today is different.

threesypeesy Thu 23-May-13 13:30:47

crowler shhhhhh there a doll!!

Those men and women fight daily for this country and should be supported for it those who want to stick up for those who attack them a vile

Both myself and dh give alot to help for heros it's a charity that has always been close to our hearts.

Nelly000 Thu 23-May-13 13:30:47

There are a lot of people who don't agree with enlisting in the armed forces given how disastrous the UK's involvement has been in Iraq/Afghanistan, etc. As long as there's no draft, the soldiers are making a choice to get involved in this endeavour.

How idealistic.

What about all the soldiers that joined up when the threat was all in Northern Ireland? Soldiers sign up for minimum terms. What if theirs isn't done? They can't just say 'I don't mind going to Northern Ireland, but no I don't fancy doing Iraq/Afghanistan thanks' you know??

What if a soldier had 22 years service and was told to deploy to Afghanistan. If it were you, would you quit and lose the gratuity/pension that you've worked for for 22 years?

How about the soldier that doesn't feel he has a choice to join because he doesn't have a decent education and it's a 'career'; since he's been told if he sits on his arse on benefits he's scum?

Nelly000 Thu 23-May-13 13:32:07

Pressed 'post message' too soon.

OP - no, I don't think you are being unreasonable wearing a HFH t-shirt and I'm astounded anyone would say you are.

Erm ... did you mean to come across as if you were calling people on this thread vile, threesy?

^I find the growing glorification of the Armed Forces in this country and the idea that if you question it at all you're not a true patriot/must hate your country both oppressive and dodgy.

I also wish that Help for Heroes didn't need to exist and that properly funded provision for our wounded servicemen & women was the norm.

That said, I don't see a problem with wearing a t-shirt supporting a charity. Unfortunately some people, egged on by the media, use H4H as a blanket ' all servicemen/women are heroes' tag rather than look at the true purpose of it as a charity for the wounded. Hence my discomfort.^

This. This. This.

halestone Thu 23-May-13 13:34:16

Puffin YANBU, infact i think instead of listening to the racist BS about Islam, wearing H4H clothing or donating to H4H or The Royal British Legion, is showing support for the soldier and his family.

As for other PP you are entitled yo your opinions but IMO, the Armed Forces do a very important job. The fact that they volunteered to do that job has nothing to do with it. They see and do things that many people will never (thankfully) have to experience. IMO we should be grateful to them and to show them some respect is the least we can do.

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