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To think we're far too scared of the sun!

(253 Posts)
BedHanger Thu 09-May-13 08:59:07

A leading lecturer in dermatology at Edinburgh university has said that the benefits of sun exposure "may far outweigh the risks" after a new study has shown an hour's exposure significantly reduces blood pressure:

www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-22433359

This is on top of our growing understanding of the vital role played by vitamin d in health.

AIBU to worry more about whether my DC are getting sufficient sun than about the potential risks? I don't let them burn btw, but I do make sure they have plenty of sun cream-free time whenever possible.

BedHanger Sun 12-May-13 17:21:18

I like LadyIsabella's view about balance. Makes a lot of sense.

Leafmould Mon 13-May-13 01:30:34

Hello wuldric, there are one or 2 of us up thread commenting on lack of specific advice for dark skinned people.

Chunderella, I do not believe that the 'experimental' nature of advice for dark skinned people is by 'necessity'

All it takes is for cancer researchers and funders of research to be interested in researching skin cancer amongst dark skinned people.

I can't find any advice which is specific for my children, let alone 'experimental advice'

Chunderella Mon 13-May-13 11:34:24

Of course it's by necessity Leafmould because it's only very recently that we have had very many dark skinned people living in Britain. There only started to be substantial numbers being born in the UK in the 1950s- people here before that eg those that came on the Windrush were much more likely to be adults of working age when they arrived. We would need to look at a cohort who had spent their lives in the UK, across their whole lives. This is because so many diseases, whether related to too much or too little sun, appear disproportionately in later life. And because we would want to know whether having only ever lived in the British climate would make a difference. It's plausible enough that someone who was used to a high level of Vitamin D until they emigrated at 20 might be different in this respect from someone with the same level of melanin who had only ever had access to low levels. That's not to say we can't glean anything at all from looking at people who came here as adults or who were born here and are young, but not as much.

So with the best will in the world, which clearly doesn't exist, nobody can tell you with certainty what your dark skinned children ought to be doing because not enough dark skinned people have lived their whole lives out in Britain yet. As such, any advice you get would have to be experimental. This is a separate issue from the fact that you don't seem to be getting even that.

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