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To think that £15000 is NOT an attractive salary?

(97 Posts)
INeedSomeSun Thu 25-Apr-13 13:49:11

I am being made redundant and feel like I should be looking for another job. I have been looking, but most are quite low paid and the ones for around £15000 are advertised as offering an 'attractive salary'.
It might be for some people, but not for people with childcare costs! Full time nursery for my 1 year old would be around £9000 and its around £2000 for my DS to attend before/after school club plus extra for school holidays.
So after all expenses, like travel costs etc, I will come out no better, if not worse than claiming job seekers!
AIBU in thinking that I might as well enjoy 6 months on job seekers with my kids & then get whatever job after that? The situation just seems nuts

We don't qualify for anything else as my DH earns over £26000

CockyFox Thu 25-Apr-13 13:52:12

Its all DH earns. We survive it isn't very attractive if you are qualified for something but is better than JSA and more than NMW.

KellyElly Thu 25-Apr-13 13:52:23

No, it isn't attractive at all.

Can you claim jobseekers if your dh is working? (genuine question, I didn't think you could)

NinaHeart Thu 25-Apr-13 13:53:27

I take your point, but a salary is not advertised with regard to how the successful appicant will spend it. It's purely to do with the level of expertise/experience required for that position, bearing in mind market forces.

You'd think I was being unreasonable is I said "£15,000 won't pay for the petrol in my Ferrari or my seven holidays abroad every year".

Salary is to to do with the job, and that only.

DesperatelySeekingSedatives Thu 25-Apr-13 13:55:45

So you'd have a combined income of approx £41000 then? As well as around £134.80 a month in CB. And you can't claim jobseekers surely as you're DH works?! Things must have changed in the year since my DP was claiming jobseekers.

£15000 pa isnt so bad depending on who you ask. I've never earned as much as that myself so I'd be thrilled grin

nicelyneurotic Thu 25-Apr-13 13:58:10

No, it's not. What are your skills? Can you do some freelance work from home or retrain?

livinginwonderland Thu 25-Apr-13 13:58:32

I'd be happy with £15,000!

pickledginger Thu 25-Apr-13 14:00:19

You can claim JSA based on having paid in.

ssd Thu 25-Apr-13 14:00:53

so would I!!

op surely you split childcare with your dh, or are you expected to pay it all

your op slightly makes me stabby

cantspel Thu 25-Apr-13 14:01:20

Depends what the job is.
If it is a for a nurse then it is not but for a basic admin job then it is.

Thurlow Thu 25-Apr-13 14:01:53

I thought that read £150,000!! grin

It's not great if you've been used to having more of an income and having money left over after childcare costs etc. Personally, I know that amount for me would have me thinking twice. But if you take a long time out, would you be able to get back in to your profession?

cantspel Thu 25-Apr-13 14:03:57

You are entilted to claim 6 month contribution jsa (if you have ppaid enough NI in your previous job) but it is called job seekers allowance for a reason and you should be looking for a job whilst claiming it.

You child care costs are a family expense so would come out of a total income of £43K.

kim147 Thu 25-Apr-13 14:04:12

It's not if you have to survive by yourself and pay rent etc and travel costs. If you've got more income from someone else, that helps.

It's only a bit less than I earnt last year - which is why I have a lot of debt.

poshfrock England Thu 25-Apr-13 14:04:58

There are/were two types of JSA - contribution based and income based. You can claim contribution based provided you have paid sufficient NIC regardless of whether your other half is earning but you only get it for 6 months. The income based one will take account of your OH's earnings. I claimed the contribution based one back in 2003 - it was about £55 per week. DH was still in full-time work. Of course it's probably all changed since then.

pickledginger Thu 25-Apr-13 14:05:14

If you've been off with your youngest you need to check if you've made enough contributions over the last 2 years to qualify for contribution based JSA.

ssd Thu 25-Apr-13 14:06:30

anyone know what the amounts are these days?

pickledginger Thu 25-Apr-13 14:08:06

Contribution based is £71.70 a week if you're 25 or over. £56.80 if you're 16 to 24. Which hardly seems fair.

MrsWembley Thu 25-Apr-13 14:08:11

Yes, I agree with those who've said it depends how you spend it! It's not for the employer to judge that. And yes, surely in a partnership, bills are spilt? Is it your DH who's saying it's not worth you going back to work?

And half the reason for going back should surely be to gain experience and all that - something to put on your CV, no? The other half should be your own sake, to use your brain/body in the best way. If you think staying at home is best for you and your family, then stay at home. If you think going back to work is better, then go back to work.

Yes, stabby is a good description of how I feel too.

cantspel Thu 25-Apr-13 14:08:52

over 25 get £71.70

OTTMummA Thu 25-Apr-13 14:08:59

Well it depends who you are and what you consider to be a good salary.

But in this climate beggars can't be choosers.

pickledginger Thu 25-Apr-13 14:13:37

You wouldn't get non contribution based JSA because of your DH's income. Also, you have to be 'available for work'. So you couldn't say you can't attend interviews because you're a SAHM because that would mean you're not looking for work. And I don't know when 'Workfare' kicks in. Working 35 hours a week + for £71.70 definitely wouldn't be an attractive salary.

flowery Thu 25-Apr-13 14:13:46

Whether it's attractive depends on the job and the local going rate for that job.

And of course it's easier to find a job from being in a job, if you will be looking in 6 months for a new one.

And if you claim JSA presumably you will be expected to apply for and accept if offered jobs like this one anyway, wouldn't you?

redrubyshoes Thu 25-Apr-13 14:14:26

I have also just been made redundant after five years and am job seeking frantically and have also signed on with some agencies. I am getting calls to take temp jobs at least an hours drive or more away for £6.50 an hour.

Over two hours driving for £6.50 an hour with petrol, tax and NI deducted is a soul destroying experience, one of companys wanted a graduate fluent in French and German for that!

15K is very little with petrol, tax, NI and the added two hour childcare costs.

I agree with OP.

Anyway back to job hunting!

LazyMonkeyButler Thu 25-Apr-13 14:15:03

Can you still get help with childcare costs if you are both working? Or is that something else that has stopped now? sad

Like others have said, it really depends what job the £15,000 is for. For a relatively low level job that would be considered attractive here, but for something more skilled probably not.

Also, why does the whole £11k childcare bill have to come from your salary? Could you not split it 50/50 with your DH? I know that would still mean the same income/outgoing as a family but it would leave you with more £ in YOUR account on payday, which might help psychologically if not practically!

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