to think it's not terribly helpful to keep referring to parents who haven't MMR'd as "whack jobs"...

(865 Posts)
MsGillis Thu 25-Apr-13 13:01:03

..or morons, or unfit parents, or up there with people who drink and drive?

I appreciate that people have very strong feelings around the subject, but I think that we need to understand that there are a significant number of parents who didn't/haven't vaccinated, not because they are crystal waving nutjobs, but because they are actually scared shitless and paralysed into indecision?

Surely there are ways and means to communicate information, and arrogantly shouting about how one person is right and anyone who disagrees is all kinds of nobhead is not going to be conducive in opening up reasonable dialogue?

Jengnr Thu 25-Apr-13 16:40:47

I'm not supportive of parents who don't vaccinate* I think it's seriously fucking irresponsible.

*Obvious caveat for those whose children are too ill to be vaccinated. Those children need everyone else to be even more than the rest of us do.

JamieandtheMagicTorch Thu 25-Apr-13 16:46:04

My advice would be, don't go on Facebook Twitter or The Daily Mail website. They are all whackos and morons

It's not terribly helpful to call anyone "whack job", or similar, just becaus they have a different view to you. Sadly that's what happens in just about every situation. Religion and politics spring to mind.

Unfortunatelyanxious Thu 25-Apr-13 16:49:08

Twatter and fuckbook are just irritating beyond belief as is The Daily Heil.

LaQueen Thu 25-Apr-13 16:56:34

Obviously, there are a small handful of DCs, who genuinely can't be vacinated for medical reasons. I seem to think, back in the 70s I couldn't be vacinated against diptheria, because I'd had febrile convulsions as a baby/toddler?

But, have very little time/patience for the parents who didn't vacinate because they felt a little inner surge of triumph/smugness that they weren't merely going to be just like everyone else, and meekly follow the herd...

And that they were every bit as equal to make a medically-based decision, as supposed know-it-all doctors who had spent over a decade training as specialists. Who needs 7 years at medical school, when you have Google - eh hmm

I don't ever say what's on my mind. And, I just smile (barely) and nod politely...but, all the while I mentally grind my teeth at these parents, and think they were utter, utter idiots.

WaynettaSlobsLover Thu 25-Apr-13 17:07:31

Ds and dd have had chickenpox already, twice in fact. I am a former HCP and need no reminding about the deaths of children who happen to suffer from underlying health problems and leaky gut syndrome. This is not reported and researched enough IMO. I keep my children away from others when they are ill and neither attends school or nursery, so do not twist and make out like I am endangering anyone. The hysteria is completely over hyped as well as the fact that certain children have extremely poor immunity due to underlying health and environmental factors. The level of basic care that a child receives having contracted measles mumps or chickenpox makes a huge difference also.

Pagwatch Thu 25-Apr-13 17:15:15

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

alistron1 Thu 25-Apr-13 17:24:04

As I get older I have little time for armchair scientists who have 'researched' vaccination programmes and exercised 'their' choice not to vaccinate because they know better. Clearly, they don't 'know better' the cosy bubble of herd immunity has given them (over the past 10 years) the luxury of choice, whist removing a safety net from the chronically ill, immunologically vulnerable who do not have the luxury to choose.

WaynettaSlobsLover Thu 25-Apr-13 17:28:31

That's why you keep your children away from other people when they are sick and don't send them to school or nurseries alistron

And don't talk about scientists so flippantly when you most likely have no idea in hell how much research one does in order to come to a conclusion about vaccination. It's not as black and white as you may think.

LaVolcan Thu 25-Apr-13 17:28:37

....as well as the fact that certain children have extremely poor immunity due to underlying health and environmental factors. The level of basic care that a child receives having contracted measles mumps or chickenpox makes a huge difference also.

I'm glad you point that out Waynetta because they appear to have been completely overlooked.

alistron1 Thu 25-Apr-13 17:30:11

Waynetta - what about when they are infectious before obvious signs of illness?

mathanxiety Thu 25-Apr-13 17:30:46

I had meningitis as a child and to say it wasn't fun for me or my parents would be very much an understatement. I have no sympathy for whoever I caught it from. I was very glad to be able to have my DCs vaccinated. Not only will they probably never get it, they will not spread it.

As a HCP you should know, Waynetta, that many illnesses are contagious before a victim shows any sign of illness. By the time you have decided to keep your child away from others it may already be too late in other words. Thanks.

JamieandtheMagicTorch Thu 25-Apr-13 17:35:50

What kind of HCP Waynetta?

Have you heard of incubation periods?

LaQueen Thu 25-Apr-13 17:37:59

Er - Waynetta.

Chicken pox incubates for several days, before any physical symptoms manifest. But during this time, the person can be infectious.

I am not a HCP...but, I would assume that you, as a HCP should be equally aware of this hmm

alistron1 Thu 25-Apr-13 17:42:27

I remember having mumps as a kid - it was horrid. Ditto German measles - the only childhood illnesses I didn't have were the ones I was vaccinated against. Funny that isn't it?

And isn't it strange how since people have 'chosen' not to vaccinate we now have outbreaks of whooping cough and measles - but obviously vaccination is still a dreadful thing and let's all sod anyone with those pesky underlying health conditions that might make these alleged 'mild' childhood illnesses fatal.

Armchair scientists who have done their painstaking research know better, clearly.

ExRatty Thu 25-Apr-13 17:44:06

I'm one of the whack jobs. I care not what I'm labelled.

LaQueen Thu 25-Apr-13 17:46:34

I had measles when I was 9. I had to be off school for 2 weeks. Full bed rest, and 4 visits from the doctor (this was back when they did home visits).

I was horribly, achingly ill - and often cried because I was in so much discomfort. My Mum got scared, when I stopped even having the energy to cry, and just lay there, dull eyed and listless sad

NumericalMum Thu 25-Apr-13 17:48:10

See in some ways I think those labels actually make them feel even more smug. <despairs>

LaVolcan Thu 25-Apr-13 17:48:38

Well, I had German measles as a 14 year old. You had to stay off school for about 3 days because you were infectious, but otherwise it was no problem.

TSO Thu 25-Apr-13 17:48:43

"I'm one of the whack jobs. I care not what I'm labelled."

You're not alone, ExRatty. While they're kvetching about us they're leaving some other soul alone.

ExRatty Thu 25-Apr-13 17:51:20

cuddles baby laqueen

NumericalMum Thu 25-Apr-13 17:52:33

LaVolcan German measles is rubella and only serious if pregnant I believe.

BlueberryHill Thu 25-Apr-13 17:53:30

Are German Measles and measles the same thing, I thought they were different and measles has the potential to more severe. Can someone medical let me know?

BlueberryHill Thu 25-Apr-13 17:53:55

Numerical, x-post, thanks

LaVolcan Thu 25-Apr-13 18:02:35

NumericalMum - I am well aware that German measles and rubella are the same thing, and serious if caught when pregnant. But still, you did help someone else with a query, so that's good.

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