to think a funeral procession is no place for protests

(344 Posts)
kim147 Tue 09-Apr-13 20:17:15

Apparently the Met are fearing a security nightmare when Thatcher's funeral takes place. Protests along the way.

No matter what you thought of her, I don't think a funeral procession is an appropriate place for a protest.

Apparently it was all organised under Gordon Browns leadership but she didn't want a full state funeral so it's been downgraded. i doubt the family have had much if a say in it TBH.

Whatever you think of her & what she did (over 30 years ago) she did it because she thought she was right and did it for her country. She has a place in history, wether one agreed with her or not.

Her funeral is NOT the time for protests or celebration and I despair that so many people are being so utterly vile.

flippinada Tue 09-Apr-13 21:18:35

I think you would need to put in a FOI request herethere

indyandlara Tue 09-Apr-13 21:18:38

Having a public, ceremonial funeral is the thing which is most inappropriate.

ParadiseChick Tue 09-Apr-13 21:22:47

But whether it was Brown or anyone else who decided she was worthy of a public pomp and circumstance send of isn't the point, it's apparently against her wishes.

Or is the baw hair of a difference between state and ceremonial enough?

AmberLeaf Tue 09-Apr-13 21:25:01

It is totally inappropriate and apparently not to her wishes, so yes, why are they doing it?

If I were either of her children I would not be allowing it.

It is obvious that there will be some form of protest, yet it is still going to happen.

Asking for trouble.

BumpingFuglies Tue 09-Apr-13 21:25:07

Protest against what? It's been and gone. I would no more turn up to "protest" at Mrs Thatcher's funeral than I would at anyone elses, no matter what I thought of them.

As others say, protest about the manner of the funeral if public funds are being used. Let those who wish to mourn have their time.

Far too many people jumping on bandwagons they do not understand.

AmberLeaf Tue 09-Apr-13 21:29:23

Far too many people jumping on bandwagons they do not understand

Far too much downplaying of the evil she did just because she is dead.

Growlithe Tue 09-Apr-13 21:29:51

The family were apparently planning it at a coordination meeting with Buck House this morning.

If I were her daughter I'd have said no.

sick0fants Tue 09-Apr-13 21:32:01

I agree with you kim

BumpingFuglies Tue 09-Apr-13 21:33:01

Amber that's not the same thing at all.

BumpingFuglies Tue 09-Apr-13 21:34:55

FTR I wasn't referring to MN jumping on bandwagons.

flangledoodle Tue 09-Apr-13 21:35:36

Hear, hear Amber.

AmberLeaf Tue 09-Apr-13 21:36:34

Bumping, I don't think people are jumping on bandwagons, do you mean those who are considered too young to be entitled to a say?

Thatcher is history, my 16 year old knows enough about her to hold his own in a discussion on her because he is interested in political history.

He has studied enough to form an opinion and has heard enough from older relatives also.

He'd probably be accused of jumping on the bandwagon too.

Perhaps the public contribution for her funeral can only come from active Tory constituencies during her reign... There, that settles it! smile

A public funeral is incredibly inappropriate.

I am actively seeking a way to protest in a useful and meaningful way and would love to hear suggestions (perhaps another thread...)

Iamsparklyknickers Tue 09-Apr-13 21:38:22

Funerals are no place imo for 'protest'.

Lets be clear about one thing though, MT's funeral will not attract true protests. Protests belong to a cause. This woman is out of power 18 years there is no cause, just bitterness. Those hanging their colours to cost issues are being dishonest (I'm sure there's the odd person who is truely angry at the cost), it's nothing but the wolves clothes to make their 'protest' relevant and slightly more socially acceptable. The armchair psychologist in me thinks they are working hard to make bombarding a funeral with bile acceptable to themselves.

To consider the scenario of the death of some evil mass murder/peadophile/rapist/genocidal dictator as the benchmark - my feelings remain the same. There is nothing joyful to take from a death. Ever. Relief, justice, ambiguity are all valid but to actually take pleasure? Displays an incredibly deep flaw and lack of appreciation of life with all those who participate. Case in point the Westborough Church.

In MT's case, I can't help but feel those who have bourne a grudge for decades are lacking in any awareness. I was only a child during her terms, but am more than up on why people blamed her for ruining there lives. Thing is you look back at the history books and her policies and influence generally make sense. No they weren't perfect, but we were not a nation that was offering up a lot of options for anyone in leadership. Regardless, it's history and has been for a long, long time. There have been countless opportunities for people to fix what they felt was wrong. It either hasn't happened because people haven't bothered, found themselves benefitting or they are backing the wrong side of a cause and can't accept they're in the wrong.

I would be incredibly interested for a journalist to profile a random cross section of some of these people- I would put very good money on a large percentage of them profiteering from the policies that were put in place during MT's office.

To hold a grudge since the 80's is impressive, but it's also ridiculous, meaningless and a shame.

30 years have passed and it's still all MT's fault?

Iamsparklyknickers Tue 09-Apr-13 21:40:13

dammit - I meant their!!! I'm not re reading again so take the flaws as you find them!

Well said SparklyKnickers

BumpingFuglies Tue 09-Apr-13 21:42:46

No, I'm talking about the twats drinking champagne in Trafalgar Square Amber and so on.

Joining in with popular opinion (which is what I think a lot of people are doing) is absolutely not the same as downplaying of the evil she did just because she is dead.

I'm not downplaying anything. Just objecting to the assumption that because people (including me) objected to many of her policies and political decisions, they have the right to disrupt her funeral.

CloudsAndTrees Tue 09-Apr-13 21:43:47

Good post sparklyknickers.

ParadiseChick Tue 09-Apr-13 21:43:51

Many areas have never recovered. It's still very real.

And I just want to highlight the poster above who stated "it's a bit late to start voicing it now"... You have no idea how, where or why people may have voiced their opposition to her policies over the years. People risked, and lost, their livelihoods, communities, way of life, even life itself to stand up for not just themselves but for others worse off than them.

Thatcher's passing has stirred up a lot of frustration and anger -this is recent history- and to even consider this kind of public send-off is disrespectful to the many, many communities, families and individuals who were the human cost of her policies.

flangledoodle Tue 09-Apr-13 21:47:11

Dreadful woman!

ChippingInIsEggceptional Tue 09-Apr-13 21:47:44

8 million - Really?? EIGHT MILLION - for a funeral?

and just to show my ignorance, why is she being cremated and not burried with Dennis?

flippinada Tue 09-Apr-13 21:55:23

I have no time for the woman alive or dead.

However, she was still a human beingand if she wanted a private funeral then that's what she should have.

An expensive funeral paid for out of funds is, to say the least, inappropriate.

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

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