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To want our doctors to give us medicine?

(136 Posts)
ditziness Tue 09-Apr-13 13:55:41

Have two kids, 11 month baby and 4 year old. DH and I got ill 3 weeks or so ago, sore and tight chested, sore throat and ears. Kids started getting it too a week after. DH went to doctor on own and got antibiotics for a chest infection. Me and kids go day after, but apparently no antibiotics needed, we've all got a virus. Meanwhile DH is fighting fit within a couple of days of antibiotics. A week later me and the kids still coughing and rotten, surviving on paracetamol and calpol, not sleeping well . On my knees really. So back to doctors, but still no antibiotics . Apparently still a virus. That DH bizarrely hasn't got.

AIBU to think they should just give us antibiotics?

Sarah919 Wed 10-Apr-13 22:07:58

LessMissAbs What's a FR1? Been in medicine 15 years and never heard the term so just curious. You've written it twice so can't be typo.

AnyoneforTurps Wed 10-Apr-13 22:34:49

I think she means an F1. Because, of course, sitting next to a (very junior) doctor is the same as being a doctor. Presumably she has learnt by osmosis.

I'm off to find a billionaire to sit next to wink

Jollyb Wed 10-Apr-13 22:35:13

Lessmissabs - assuming you mean FY1, we used to think poorly of GPs when we were house officers. We then grew up and realised what a difficult job that they have (I say this as a hospital doctor).

Sarah919 Wed 10-Apr-13 22:57:21

Well I suspected FY1, but that's not something you can get wrong if you're married to one surely?

Well yes. Because a group of what are essentially 6th year medical students know everything about General practice don't they?

I can just see it now. Waxing lyrical in the Mess, wearing chinos having stupid like a spare part at an arrest half an hour ago.

maddening Thu 11-Apr-13 07:10:55

Ask gp for a referral for private tests to confirm whether bacterial or viral?

Jollyb Thu 11-Apr-13 07:29:16

That's the whole point Maddening. There aren't easy and quick tests to differentiate between bacterial and viral infections. I treat chemotherapy patients. They are frequently admitted unwell with infections. In > 85 % of cases we don't ever identify the source of the infection - this is despite a battery of blood tests and cultures, x rays, sputum and urine cultures. In the end we have to do exactly what GPs do - which is to treat on the basis of the most likely cause.

DIYapprentice Thu 11-Apr-13 08:44:23

You get good GPs and bad GPs, just like in any other profession. There is 1 GP in the practice I attend who has NEVER prescribed ABs, refused to refer etc.

He wouldn't prescribe ABs for DS1 who was repeatedly suffering from tonsillitis, and ear infections. (Through SUMMER, mind you)

He refused to refer him when I said he had such difficulty breathing at night I could ALWAYS hear him breathing from the other end of the house - 'we don't refer for snoring'....

He told a friend that her illness can't possibly be bacterial as her tonsils weren't inflamed - they would be the tonsils that were removed when she was 12?!

He does, however, have a charming bedside manner - he gets that right, at least.

Fortunately he's the only one like that in the surgery. The others look at them properly, and don't just fall back on the 'let's not prescribe ABs for anything' line.

(DS2 was treated with ABs, which saved his hearing. Saw ENT, and tonsils and adenoids removed, grommets put in and is like a new child, but still needs speech therapy due to the extended periods of deafness experienced while ill.)

The crap GP is only 1 out of 8 GPs at the surgery, and the others have all been brilliant. They take each case on a 'let's look at this case individually' basis. They will, in severe cases but where it's not really possible to know definitely whether it's viral or bacterial, write a script as a precautionary measure with instructions to fill it if there has been no improvement within X days. I have always followed their instructions, and I'd say I've filled the script less than 1 in 5 times.

I'm lucky I have the choice of GP - sadly others don't. But 1 bad GP doesn't make for a bad profession - please stop generalising like that.

ditziness Thu 11-Apr-13 12:44:25

Incase anyone is intested, just took the three of us back to GP's, same doctor, and she prescribed us all antibiotics and eye drops for the baby. She acknowledged that if she was thinking just about the clinical signs she wouldn't have given it, as the kids chests sounded clear and just mine had a crackle. But decided to because the illness has gone on so long in us all and that the antibiotics had worked for my husband.

:-)

Jollyb Thu 11-Apr-13 12:57:19

Hope you feel better soon smile

DPotter Thu 11-Apr-13 13:31:07

Over Christmas I had a really persistant cough with ucky greenies just as OP described - went on for 5 weeks. Followed a friend's recommendation to see a herbalist. was given 2 of the most disgusting tasting potions and some eyebright tablets (for my sinuses). Within a couple of days my sinuses were sooo much clearer and my coughing stopped. Over the next few days my energy levels increased dramatically and all for about £40. Worth every penny.

Please don't think antibiotics are the answer to everything. Your GP basically told you she was giving them to you to get you out of her surgery.

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