in saying that a child I know who only has very limited vision, blind?

(78 Posts)
Alliwantisaroomsomewhere Fri 05-Apr-13 14:25:04

For all intents and purposes the little girl is in my opinion, blind. She has extremely limited peripheral vision in one eye only, the other eye being a prosthesis.

When I said that she was blind, someone corrected me by saying "visually impaired". Genuine question: is it rude to call someone blind? Is it an offensive term??

AIBU to call someone blind when they are exactly that??

Alliwantisaroomsomewhere Mon 08-Apr-13 13:49:37

"Do you actually need to say either? I'd be concerned if my cm was discussing my child with somebody else.
Especially if she said "the little blind girl" (or deaf in my dds case), the child is not defined by their disability."

FrustratedSycamore, I was talking about the child to my childminding mentor and support person from my local Authority. The child has been placed with me by the local authority through their funding programme for early years children with additional needs of all sorts.

I was not idling chatting about some kid. I was legitimately and professionally sharing information about a child in my care and sharing information on how well she was settling in and how much good the programme was able to do for children with additional needs of whatever sort. FFS.

Thanks everyone, for all the input. I am not going to respond anymore to to further replies, but I really do appreciate the well meant guidance that I have been given. I do not feel the need to justify why I was talking about her anymore or why I referred to her disability anymore. It is all irrelevant to the question I had asked.

Thanks for the sensible replies to those that make them.

lougle Mon 08-Apr-13 15:23:55

"I do not feel the need to justify why I was talking about her anymore or why I referred to her disability anymore. It is all irrelevant to the question I had asked."

Actually, it's central to it. The fact is, that it's quite rare to have to mention a distinctive characteristic of a person as their core 'person'.

By saying 'the blind/VI girl' you are stripping away her name, her personality...what makes her her.

It's not people being fussy or PC, it's simply making people aware that the language they use is not neutral.

2old2beamum Mon 08-Apr-13 18:18:26

Just to say my DS is HI and VI we belong to SENSE where he is called deafblind. Quicker and easier for people to understand than euphamisms.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now