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To ask for a list of jobs that mean that teachers have never had it so good and should stop complaining?

(153 Posts)
chicaguapa Thu 04-Apr-13 20:26:18

I thought I'd try and equal the number of threads about the Philpots with ones about teaching? wink

Why oh why does everyone have to have an opinion on teaching? <wails> Why is it ok to say 'well if you don't like it, get another job?' Don't people want teachers to teach their children or is everyone planning on home edding?

One argument is that there are other jobs out there that are just as shit. Maybe we could just list the jobs that have all of the following:

A similar level of unrelenting pressure
National expectation & judgement of results
Responsibility for future success of the next generation
Constant derision from service users ie parents/ public
Systematic devaluing of the profession by their employer ie government
Similar annual hours
Same post-graduate qualification level
Same salary

Then all the teachers can say yes, they are shit jobs too. And all the other people can be pleased that the teachers have acknowledged they don't have the only shit job in the world and theirs is just one of them.

Jobs have to fit all of the above criteria or they don't count.

Bodicea Mon 08-Apr-13 19:04:44

It basically takes a year to train to be a teacher as all you need is a degree in something that is totally irrelevant. So post grad it may be ( unless you do a b ed) but anything that takes only a tear to train in can't be that hard.

TroublesomeEx Mon 08-Apr-13 19:11:08

Bodicea I actually think that the one year teacher training is ridiculous and no where near long enough. It doesn't really matter what your UG degree is in if you teach primary because you teach the full curriculum so having an English degree is nice, but not relevant for teaching numeracy or science. At secondary you have to have a degree in a national curriculum subject and you train to teach that subject.

I did my PGCE at a well regarded university and focused very much on methods of assessment and fullfilling Ofsted's requirement. It didn't really include any teaching of teaching, next to nothing on SEN but a heck of a lot on fulfilling statutory requirements.

It felt like a bit of a car crash, tbh, and I did a year of supply before I looked to undertake my NQT because I felt that the course completely unprepared anyone for the responsibility of classroom teaching. So I don't agree that anything that only takes a year to train for can't be that hard, I think the training is inadequate.

BoneyBackJefferson Mon 08-Apr-13 19:48:36

Bodicea

Please please please try it.

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