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To be utterly pissed off about people of short stature being used in Peter Kay's thing

(144 Posts)
Verycold Fri 15-Mar-13 21:49:27

Yes yes they didn't have to do it. But they probably needed the money. As the mother of a boy with dwarfism it just makes me so cross.

snice Sun 17-Mar-13 00:33:44

I guess I thought you were extremely patronising to the OP who has probably thought long and hard about her own child's future a lot more than you have hmm

LilQueenie Sun 17-Mar-13 00:49:23

OP Im sorry it was patronising.

MrsDeVere Sun 17-Mar-13 07:31:58

Let me break it down for you
'he used to love the sketches and dance along' - what sketches? What are you talking about. Dance along? WTF are you talking about.

You used to work with someone? - so what? Yo think that gives you an insight into having this condition or parenting a child with this condition? It doesn't.

They were in Pheonix Nights? So?

'Your child has a lot of opportunities but if you pass on your ideas.... ' the op is upset with people with her child's condition being used as comedy props. So is this the sort of opportunity she will be depriving her son of? That and 'dancing along' 'for the amusement of his colleagues?

'he may start to believe' what exactly? That he can do what HE wants and not conform to the stereotype allocated to him?

Seems to me that with an advocate willing to speak out on his behalf and make her feelings known about this sort of tossery, the OPs son can do far better than that.

hmm

Coatonarack Sun 17-Mar-13 10:01:37

I support mrsdevere and OP wholeheartedly. There is a boy in my DS's class with downs and I've heard comments like "oh he's a great little lad, doesn't he do well." ie comments which single him out by people who don't see beyond his condition. So they think they are being nice but in fact they are still reinforcing the stereotypes.

NoelHeadbands Sun 17-Mar-13 10:07:47

Some of the comments on this thread are staggering. I'd like to think it's a case of people not engaging their brains before posting, but sadly (and scarily) I suspect many really do hold these opinions.

DancesWithWoolEnPointe Sun 17-Mar-13 11:32:37

My dwarf friend uses dwarf and doesn't like PORG. But he is a fan of calling a spade a spade, not An Impliment For Digging. I obviously cannot speak for anyone other than him.

countrykitten Sun 17-Mar-13 15:45:27

My friend hates PORG too.

shebird Sun 17-Mar-13 20:01:19

I believe that who choose of reduced stature that to join the entertainment business should just choose their jobs carefully. If they are happy to make money by using their short stature to their advantage in movies etc. then thats up to them. But there is a fine line between laughing at you and laughing with you. You have to be careful not to reinforce stereotypes and then wonder why people laugh at your condition. I applaud people like Ellie Simmons in the Olympics for breaking down these stereotypes and showing such talent and courage.

hazeyjane Sun 17-Mar-13 20:06:59

Yes, but if Countrykitten and Dances, friends don't mind and also don't like being called a person of restricted growth, then that is all we need to know, after all, 'some of my best friends....' And all that.

countrykitten Sun 17-Mar-13 20:07:12

What stereotypes are there about people with dwarfism then? Genuinely interested to hear your answer....

hazeyjane Sun 17-Mar-13 20:45:35

This is quite a good interview

Living with dwarfism: interview with Nichola Dean and
Stefan Garde.

'...if i had to say my biggest problem, it would be stereotyping.
i don’t feel in any way disadvantaged in terms of in employment or i haven’t
in education or in society in terms of socialising, but i would say people’s
biggest ignorance is that they expect me to be like the people that are
stereotyped on the television.
S: i think the main stereotypes that we see that i don’t really find that good for
dwarfs and myself is the kind you see on television that kind of bounce around
and do silly things to just be like a laughing stock really for people to look at
and laugh and all that.
N: So when people see us out on the streets, sometimes they don’t see us as
human beings, they think oh well it’s ok to laugh and point and i think that’s
very different to other disabilities. i think, you know, if you saw somebody
in a wheelchair, you wouldn’t laugh at them and i think it can only – my only
explanation of that is that it does go back to comical stereotyping of dwarfism in the media. if there’s people that are going to go on programmes and be a court jester or
be a clown, especially on children’s television, then children are going to grow
up and might only actually ever see a dwarf in that role and might never meet
a dwarf as a friend or in a pub or in a different environment....'

countrykitten Sun 17-Mar-13 20:54:34

Interesting stuff and definite food for thought.

Redbindy Sun 17-Mar-13 20:57:42

Message deleted by Mumsnet for breaking our Talk Guidelines. Replies may also be deleted.

SpecialAgentKat Sun 17-Mar-13 21:06:34

Wow Redbindy. Instead of getting banned, I'll just point out to you that a mother up thread lost her DS to this condition, so your cheap and old as chips joke not only wasn't funny, it was beyond insensitive.

hazeyjane Sun 17-Mar-13 21:48:01

Really, redbindy - jeez.

Namechangeabc Sun 17-Mar-13 22:18:13

When we were told that the scans indicated that DS2 had some form of dwarfism, the only thing I knew about dwarves was Snow White and that the actor inside R2D2 in Star Wars was a dwarf. And I'm sure we were not unusual - Snow White and pantomimes are probably what most people think when they hear "dwarf." So it was a steep learning curve to get past that and find out the facts.

Peter Kay's sketch just makes life harder for those getting such a diagnosis; you are being told your baby has a condition which is routinely caricatured in a way that no other genetic disorder is.

Although I don't have a problem with the term "dwarf" as such, we did tend to tell people that we were expecting a baby with "bone dysplasia" because "dwarf" carries so many connotations, in terms of "circus" "panto" and "object of fun."

MrsDeVere Sun 17-Mar-13 23:19:27

Bloody hell I thought Redbindy was a troll. They are a regular poster shock
No.words.

SpecialAgentKat Mon 18-Mar-13 06:15:27

Ditto MrsDeVere sad

My DSS (lived with us since birth... Complex story, not OW but have rights to him) Has a severe SEN that people seem to find hilarious.

Whoever madeup that sticks and stones song shpuld bloody well have all us mums smack them with sticks!

shebird Mon 18-Mar-13 19:58:41

hazeyjane interesting comments on media stereotyping and sums up the issue perfectly. This is probably the only condition where it is still acceptable to poke fun at a disability or difference in the media. I mean they are less likely to poke fun at those with ginger hair or a stammer on tv than dwarfism. Why is this ok?

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