That anyone can provide a decent home education for their child

(227 Posts)
akaemmafrost Sun 17-Feb-13 20:06:20

If they are inclined to?

I have no choice but to HE ds, he has multiple SN and is unable to function in any of our local schools.

Every single time I tell someone I get shock hmm or a mixture of both. Nine times out of ten I am asked if I am a teacher? No, I am not.

With access to a library and Internet AIBU to believe that anyone who is inclined to do so can provide a decent Home Education for their child?

I've been thinking about this for quite a while now, why the shock, judgement and sometimes downright horror whenever I tell anyone I HE? Is it really so scary and unbelievable that I can provide this to ds without being formally trained?

It seems to provoke incredibly strong opinions, even from complete strangers, which they feel they must strenuously share with me usually. So just wondering really as I can never really ask them.

Pootles2010 Sun 17-Feb-13 20:11:21

I agree, it's certainly possible for some. However, many (myself included) can't give up work, so not for all. sad

CockyFox Sun 17-Feb-13 20:12:01

I'd be inclined to agree with you, I do however think it may take a certain type of person to be able to make sure the child in question socialises, I know I am too shy to go out to groups so would struggle with that but I would feel confident in my ability to prived a good academic education.

Pop over to the HE board on here, and there's a FB group too, if you're on there. It's a very very common thing, that people who have nothing whatsoever to do with you and yours will take it upon themselves to offer their ram their opinion of your choice for your child hmm
There is a wealth of snotty suitable answers out there for every occasion though grin

simplesusan Sun 17-Feb-13 20:13:15

Well why don't you ask them?
Perhaps they seriously believe that only qualified teachers would be able to HE.
Perhaps they wonder how on earth you do it.
Perhaps they wonder how you manage to afford it, as in when do you work, if you do work.
Obviously if you have never HE then you don't know these things so they are probably just curious.

CloudsAndTrees Sun 17-Feb-13 20:13:17

Almost anyone with an ounce of intelligence can do it at primary level, but I don't think everyone could do it at senior. And not everyone has the neccesary ounce of intelligence required, nor the patience, motivation, organisational skills, and many other things needed to make HE a success. I think I'd start to struggle at about Y4/5, but then my dc have been better at maths than me since they were in Y3!

Teaching a child with SN is different though, and I can well imagine that you as the person who knows your child better than anyone else is likely to be the best teacher he could possibly have.

YANBU.

I'd be tempted to strenuously share my opinions about the sort of person who thinks they know anything about Home Ed, your particular circumstances or why you should give a shiny shit about uninformed and unsolicited 'advice'.

sukysue Sun 17-Feb-13 20:14:00

Yep definitely op as long as they look into it properly and get all the right resources and know what they have to do AND THEN DO IT!LOL

idshagphilspencer Sun 17-Feb-13 20:14:00

No I couldn't and neither would I want to.

kinkyfuckery Sun 17-Feb-13 20:14:23

It's certainly possible if you have the inclination and the money to not work. Me, however, I don't like my kids enough to spend that amount of time with them every day wink

McNewPants2013 Sun 17-Feb-13 20:16:36

I couldn't just give up work to teach my children, and i wouldn't have the patients to teach them.

I would be scared of fucking thier lives up.

WorraLiberty Sun 17-Feb-13 20:16:37

No I don't think anyone can necessarily do it.

I think it depends on the parent's relationship with the child, the child's willingness to learn and a fair bit of self discipline on the parent's part.

The parent's attitude towards education and learning will also play a big part in whether HE becomes successful or not.

But essentially, you shouldn't be concerned with what other people think.

Do what works for your child and you and ignore them.

natwebb79 Sun 17-Feb-13 20:17:00

I have to say that as a secondary school teacher I often wonder how people manage to home educate to a decent level beyond age 11 unless they have the funds to pay for private tutors? This is a genuine question, not a dig by the way.

tabulahrasa Sun 17-Feb-13 20:17:56

I think it depends on what you mean by a decent education... I couldn't teach my DC A level physics with all the books in the world.

ENormaSnob Sun 17-Feb-13 20:18:34

I couldn't do it.

I don't have the patience for one.

I can't afford to give up work.

SavoyCabbage Sun 17-Feb-13 20:19:33

Not everyone can I would say as some people are skewed in their views and children need to know that sometimes different people think different things are true.

It must be a pain though. I'm an immigrant and I can't have a conversation with anyone or buy a pint of milk sometimes without explaining myself and telling my whole life story and then getting grilled on how wonderful life is.

I suppose people are just looking for something to say. Like how mothers of twins complain that everyone comments on it.

akaemmafrost Sun 17-Feb-13 20:27:32

Well mainly positive responses smile which is nice to read.

Just watching Top Gear with ds (he is obsessed!) will read properly afterwards.

TeWiSavesTheDay Sun 17-Feb-13 20:27:33

I think there is so much debate going on over how our DC are taught while they are in school that the idea of having to process all that and work out what is relevent for your family... plus the sheer amount of content you would have to cover with your child if you want them to do GCSEs/Alevels etc - including topics that maybe you were bad at when you were at school makes it all seem very scary to lots of people.

In reality I suppose you educate yourself about anything your shaky on at the same time you educate your child.

But it is a lot to comprehend if it isn't normal to you. It's taken me ages lurking on HE threads here to really get how different people make it work.

JamieandtheMagicTorch Sun 17-Feb-13 20:30:37

I think it is entirely possible. And desirable/ necessary in some circumstances. My views have changed on this since coming on MN.

ReallyTired Sun 17-Feb-13 20:31:28

Home education can be very sucessful if the person delivering the education is prepared to work their socks off and be very disiciplined. I don't believe that every home educator is as effective as school.

I think that if my son was home educated then he would doing nothing but maths, music, biology and ICT. The idea of getting ds to do writing, Art or PE would fill me with dread, hence I send him to school to do the stuff he hates.

natwebb79 Sun 17-Feb-13 20:32:30

But again as a fully qualified teacher who understands the years it takes to become expert enough in one subject to even do GCSEs justice, I'm interested to hear how anybody can ensure that their child receives high quality tuition in maths, English language/literature, sciences and perhaps a foreign language, humanity subject etc?

TheOriginalSteamingNit Sun 17-Feb-13 20:35:45

No, I don't think 'anyone' can do it at all!

simplesusan Sun 17-Feb-13 20:38:27

Not everyone can I would say as some people are skewed in their views and children need to know that sometimes different people think different things are true.

Savoy cabbage is spot on with this.

Sex education would be one of my stumbling blocks. Not at primary level but at teenager level.
I have opinions and views on the matter and whilst I may have passed those on to the dcs, I am aware that actually a qualified sex education teacher is far better at dealing with this than I am. At dc's school this is exactly what happens. Same applies to morals and such. Everyone has their own and it isn't always good for children to only hear one opinion.

WorraLiberty Sun 17-Feb-13 20:38:46

But again as a fully qualified teacher who understands the years it takes to become expert enough in one subject to even do GCSEs justice, I'm interested to hear how anybody can ensure that their child receives high quality tuition in maths, English language/literature, sciences and perhaps a foreign language, humanity subject etc?

Exactly that ^^

For me it would be fairly easy to HE at Primary level but not at all after that

Well certainly not to the standard my DS's senior school teaches.

InvaderZim Sun 17-Feb-13 20:41:39

Y'all, home education isn't done in a vacuum! If someone isn't qualified to help their child learn at GCSE or A level, other people teach courses for home-educated children in lots of different subjects. Or your child enters the school system at secondary. Or maybe they want to learn a trade instead. Or you get a tutor in.

It's not rocket science.

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