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To expect mums to get their children vaccinated?

(272 Posts)
againagain Wed 13-Feb-13 20:17:14

Met two mums at play group today who said they didn't/weren't. Their reasons were autism, all that stuff on the Internet, drugs companies making money and keeping their children 'clean'. WTF?? Am I right in thinking their kids are safe though because 'the herd' is immunised? I just think there's a certain mother type who thinks anything 'non-natural' or scientific is wrong. Rant over

amandine07 Wed 13-Feb-13 20:47:27

You are definitely NBU!

SamSmalaidh Wed 13-Feb-13 20:47:49

Does it matter how much research a parent has done? It isn't just their own child who is at risk, they are risking other people's health.

scaevola Wed 13-Feb-13 20:49:43

YABU to think only mothers should be responsible.

I read somewhere (The Economist?) that you need 90%+ vaccination rate to get herd immunity but that this varies from disease to disease. The article pointed out that we are possibly the first generation of parents not to witness the effects of measles, diptheria, TB etc.

AmandinePoulain Wed 13-Feb-13 20:51:00

My dd2 is too young for the MMR, and the primary school closest to our house (luckily not the one dd1 attends) has had 10 cases of measles in the last few weeks. Out of 400 children that attend the school, 60 are not fully vaccinated shock. I'm terrified for my baby, and there's nothing I can do to protect her for another 6 months, and all because other people have chosen not to vaccinate their children, because of a totally debunked piece of "research". sad

SomethingOnce Wed 13-Feb-13 20:51:41

Pag, what is [odfo]?

TidyDancer Wed 13-Feb-13 20:52:12

YABU for starting a topic again that inflames people so much. But I'm guessing you're new and you probably didn't realise that!

YAalsoBU for condemning a parent without an attempt at understanding their opinion. Sounds like they had varied reasons, and they are entitled to their own perspective.

Finally, YABridiculouslyU for thinking/stating that mothers should be the ones to get the jabs. When did it become only one parents responsibility?

Posted too soon. Some of these diseases are becoming resistant to anti-biotics (I'm thinking specifically of TB) and so are much,much harder to treat.

glossyflower Wed 13-Feb-13 20:54:57

YABU in that everyone is entitled to free choice. If your kids are vaccinated anyway why is there a problem?!

You know the MMR actually contains foetal cells? Foetal cells taken from two foetus's abortions back in the 60's/70's and their cells are stripped and used to host the vaccines.

Some people would have problems with that alone, injecting their children with cells taken from foetus's.

ReallyTired Wed 13-Feb-13 20:56:31

Fairyegg
I think the evidence for immunisations is pretty strong. Research is pretty clear that children who don't get vacinated die. In the third world people queue up for hours becuase they have experienced measles deaths first hand.

The MMR has a 90% sucess rate in achieving immunity. It is why children get given an MMR booster so that they have 99% chance of being protected. If all healthy children were vacinated then the 1% who weren't protected by the MMR would be protected by herd immunity.

Even if an immunised child does get measles its likely to be far milder than if they had not been vacinated.

The evidence that autism is genetic is pretty strong. I am sure that one day there will be a genetic test that will diagnose autism spectrum disorders.

something it means 'oh do fuck off'. sad

againagain Wed 13-Feb-13 21:01:16

Sorry I didn't know there was a different place for vaccination debates. I used the phrase mums because I only met the mums and I wasn't about to ask if their husbands agreed with them (surely v patronising). When looking into MMR for my DS (now 6) I found nothing convincing or scientific behind the scary headlines ... and I'm just surprised that even now, way on from Wakefield, people don't vaccinate.

propertyNIGHTmareBEFOREXMAS Wed 13-Feb-13 21:03:52

Yabu. I would not want to see anyone physically forced to be injected by whatever gorern

propertyNIGHTmareBEFOREXMAS Wed 13-Feb-13 21:04:19

Governing body is in charge that year.

SomethingOnce Wed 13-Feb-13 21:05:25

Tut, tut.

(Thanks for enlightening me.)

HollyBerryBush Wed 13-Feb-13 21:06:49

You know the MMR actually contains foetal cells? Foetal cells taken from two foetus's abortions back in the 60's/70's and their cells are stripped and used to host the vaccines.

can you link to that please? a bone fide source.

Kyrptonite Wed 13-Feb-13 21:08:17

I'd rather my child had the jab and developed autism than didn't have the jab and died of whatever disease.

I also don't have a problem with aborted foetal cells being used in vaccines. It makes sense to use them to help fight disease than just discard them (or whatever happens to the aborted foetus)

Owllady Wed 13-Feb-13 21:08:22

do any of you actually understand what autism is and how severely and profoundly it can affect people?

it may well be a small percentage have problems post vaccination but if you have hereditary factors etc I think you should be given a choice

ReallyTired Wed 13-Feb-13 21:08:28

Lots of countries make vacination a condition of state education. People can decide not to vacinate their children but they have no access to state funded schooling or childcare.

In my area most unvacinated children have lazy parents rather than parents who actively object to vacinations. Prehaps it would make sense for a health visitor/ school nurse to vacinate children in a nursery setting. Children who are behind with their vacines in reception/nursery could have their vacinations in school.

Owllady Wed 13-Feb-13 21:09:06

I had mumps, measles twice and rubella and I am fine

CanAnybodyMakeSenseofThis Wed 13-Feb-13 21:10:42

The link to autism was actually total bollox. I'm amazed people still think it's relevant.

AmandinePoulain raises a really big issue for me. I would find it very difficult to forgive the parents of a child that carried measles to my baby (who was too young to be immunised) on the basis of very poor science. There will always be a small number of children/adults who can't be immunised for good reason and they, and those too young for immunisations, need the herd immunity for protection. I was relieved when DD was immunised and the risks diminished.

While chicken pox is not a routine immunisation here, it is available privately.

redspottydress Wed 13-Feb-13 21:11:53

The human fetal cells are listed in the inserts as human diploid cells. There are cells from animals too - bovine.

Owllady Wed 13-Feb-13 21:11:57

why was it bollocks?

morethanpotatoprints Wed 13-Feb-13 21:12:10

YABU but I understand.

I have 3 dc, 2 were immunised fine had boosters, pre school etc. However ds2 was allergic not to egg but something else. As an asthmatic we were advised against having further immunisations until he was well into school.

I will say that if a parent for any reason has not had dc immunised they should HAVE to tell all professionals dealing with their dc. Nurseries, childcare workers should be told so when an out break is found the dc can be monitored. I felt it was the least I could do to protect other peoples dc.

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