To think that four hours was too long

(89 Posts)
pamplem0usse Sat 09-Feb-13 23:49:24

My 4.5 mo DS needed a medical procedure on fri that required a cannula.
Four doctors attempted for two hours before calling an aneasthetist to have a go. He tried for another hour and a half and failed. There are at least fourteen puncture wounds in his neck alone, each representing several attempts.
I eventually called a halt to it as he'd not been allowed milk for five hours and the procedure would have taken another hour. He wasn't given any form of aneasthetic. They want me to go in for another try next week. would i be being unreasonable to insist we have it done elsewhere?

BabyRoger Sun 10-Feb-13 11:35:56

How awful OP.

I would complain. Maybe next time they will think about what to do in advance.

My DS had to have a canula and op when he was just 3 weeks old. The doctor came to put in the canula for drip and her, me and the nurse who was helping sat down and discussed what was going to happen as it would be difficult. He was so tiny!

The nurse fed him sugar water stuff out of a little packet whilst the doctor got on with it. Failed the first time and said she would only try once more before deciding on the next course of action. It worked the second time.

I think your little one's (and yours) experience warrants a complaint. Poor wee thing.

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Sirzy Sun 10-Feb-13 11:52:39

* I have no confidence in this hospital*

Please insist on being transferred elsewhere preferably to a Childrens hospital but if thats not an option just to a different hospital. You need to have confidence that your child is being treated correctly.

HugAndRoll Sun 10-Feb-13 12:27:57

What is the other thing they do in an emergency? I ask because on Monday (the day my baby had 17 needles for 1 successful cannula) I was informed that if they couldn't get a vein they would have to do something else which is "not very nice". They did give my ds lots of breaks but they had no choice, a line had to go in and I believe that saved his life as his heart rate was dangerously high and he was completely dehydrated. When they took blood tests through the cannula his blood was thick and "dry".

I'm not condoning what happened to your LO op but do you think deep inside that it was just a case of they didn't want to be defeated or that it was the lesser of two evils as in my ds case?

HugAndRoll Sun 10-Feb-13 12:29:03

By the way this was in a children's hospital and cannulation was attempted by 2 nurses (one a surgical staff nurse), 2 doctors and a consultant surgeon.

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 12:30:13

Inraoessuous which goes through the bone is one option.

HugAndRoll Sun 10-Feb-13 12:33:49

Thanks fut off to google that now.

ledkr Sun 10-Feb-13 12:34:31

Or a Hickman line? It's different in an emergency of course but its still ethical to consider the patients pain no matter how young.
I had chemo and towards the end my veins were knackered. I had to sit with my arm in warm water and drink loads to make the veins more plump. Now I can only have needles on my left side so it's always a struggle but they don't just keep digging.

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 12:34:50

Ive most probably spelt it shite lol

HugAndRoll Sun 10-Feb-13 12:37:08

That doesn't look pleasant. Glad they managed to get a line in eventually.

Pobblewhohasnotoes Sun 10-Feb-13 12:37:42

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 12:30:13
Inraoessuous which goes through the bone is one option.

Not for a standard procedure it isn't! It's a horrible thing and leaves a scar and is used in an emergency when unable to get fluids into someone.

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 12:39:26

I didnt say it was an option for a standard procedure did I? I was responding to HugandRolls post asking what the other option in an emergency situation was...

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 12:42:32

And as a qualified paeds nurse I do have a some idea about access in emergency situations...

VivaLeBeaver Sun 10-Feb-13 12:43:31

Intraosseous access sounds a bit horrific but I'm assured by a colleague its no more painful than ordinary cannulation. He used one of the "bone guns" on himself to see what it felt like and said it was fine.

Pobblewhohasnotoes Sun 10-Feb-13 12:44:33

And as a qualified paeds nurse I do have a some idea about access in emergency situations...

Yup and I'm a qualified paeds nurse too, and don't think it's a solution.

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 12:45:18

Ouch viva what a weirdo! The noise it makes when its sited is bad enough to put me off!

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 12:46:20

You dont think its a solution when a child needs fluid resus and going to theatre for a CVC would cause considerable delay?

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 12:48:35

What would your 'solution' be though? Bearing in mind the time implications and infection risk of a CVC for an acute emergency?

I thought it was obvious that Fut was answering this, What is the other thing they do in an emergency? I ask because on Monday (the day my baby had 17 needles for 1 successful cannula) I was informed that if they couldn't get a vein they would have to do something else which is "not very nice"

Intraosseous is taught as a likely way to give fluid to an infant in a resus situation on the PILS.

HugAndRoll Sun 10-Feb-13 12:58:47

pobble that response was for me as that was a very real solution on Monday for my ds. For him it was 17th time lucky for normal cannulation but it was literally a case of he HAD to have IV fluid and antibiotics or I may not have brought him home on Friday.

HugAndRoll Sun 10-Feb-13 12:59:51

Sorry to hijack your thread op.

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 13:00:12

It is recommended in an emergency as the second choice of access if venous access isn't possible as stated in the Resuscitation Council Guidelines

Teapot13 Sun 10-Feb-13 13:00:38

I don't think they can use numbing cream on under 1's. They sometimes try it but it causes reactions that make it harder to see the veins.

I know from experience with DD that it can extremely difficult to get a vein in a small baby -- even for an experienced, competent person -- but 4 hours is way out of order. I would definitely complain and demand a new plan when they try again.

FutTheShuckUp Sun 10-Feb-13 13:02:34

You would think after all the medical advances we have seen over the past twenty years at least they would have come up with an easier way to cannulate babies!!

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