To accept even though I'm not willing to give?

(267 Posts)
StickEmUp Sat 19-Jan-13 19:33:22

I was going to dress this up but i think better blunter.

Although I'm worried about a flaming.

Im very squeamish and quite unwilling to give blood due to that fact.

If i was to need a transfusion in the future, would it be unethical to accept?

When I'm dead, anyone is welcome to any part of my body and I've made damn sure I'm on the donor register and everyone knows ill haunt them if they refuse on my behalf when I'm dead.

Blood however, while alive, I'm not sure.

Mandy21 Mon 21-Jan-13 22:26:56

I haven't read all the posts - but I'm a donor - my Dad was a keen supporter and took my sister and I on our 18th birthday as a "birthday treat". We've been donating ever since.

Fast forward quite a few years and giving birth to premature twins - I know lots of people are squeamish and have a low pain threshold but if you ever witness doctors trying to put a cannula into a 2lb baby (whose veins are thinner than a piece of cotton) as they need a blood transfusion - and its your flesh & blood - you'd be so thankful that people have put themselves through half an hour of discomfort.

The adverts do really capture what its all about - it genuinely is the most generous thing you can do.

GreenGateGeorge Mon 21-Jan-13 22:48:29

I went with my husband to give blood (he's also on the bone marrow register) with the intention of giving blood. He was having some blood taken and they suggested I watch so I would be aware of what was happening. I have a very severe phobia of needles but I thought I could just grow up and handle it. Unfortunately just the sight of him having his blood taken made me vomit and faint. I also fainted and threw up when I had a very necessary blood test a few months ago. The blood donation people suggested that I don't give blood- if you're that bad it's best you don't waste their time and resources. I know people that give blood, however, and do not want to be organ donors, whereas my husband and I have an agreement that we will literally bury a bag of bits if possible- everything that can be used will be used in the event of our deaths, including bits that people are funny about like skin, eyes, bones, etc. I don't mind if they literally flay me, but I really don't think I am going to be able to sit having a pint of blood pumped out of my arm. You're not being unreasonable, and it's not the same as can't be bothered. If you are in need of a blood transfusion it's a medical decision that's usually taken when you're out of action. Do what you can- it's not the end of the world smile

expatinscotland Mon 21-Jan-13 22:52:35

If anyone's on the fence and looking for some inspiration, my offer still stands: PM me and I'll be happy to provide you with photos of my brave, beautiful little girl, whose fellow patients present and future need us! smile

bottleofbeer Mon 21-Jan-13 23:03:06

I'll donate on Monday in her honour! smile

expatinscotland Mon 21-Jan-13 23:07:20

And it's really wonderful to see so many who have tried or are giving blood with Aillidh in mind. smile

girlynut Mon 21-Jan-13 23:10:43

My parents took me along to the blood donors on my 18th birthday (should have been down the pub really!) and, other than breaks when I had our two children, I've always donated. Also on the Anthony Nolan trust bone marrow register.

Recently, I failed the "pin prick" test tube test thingy. Rather than sinking, the blood drop merrily floated there in the tube. Fortunately, the nurse offered me the option of taking some blood from my arm and testing it in a little machine. I hit the magic number and was able to donate. Will be making sure I eat lots of liver and broccolli the day before my next donation!

If you're likely to faint or vomit, it's probably best not to bother. I told the nurse what a wuss my DP was for not donating but she explained that a fainting patient takes up a bed for too long and that they'd rather take two donations in that time.

bottleofbeer Mon 21-Jan-13 23:15:01

My husband practically fainted. I swear to god I was so embarrassed. I looked over and there were nurses fanning him with leaflets and he was lying there all grey.

I marched him home and showed him his arse!

apostropheuse Mon 21-Jan-13 23:29:25

expat My mother died of acute myeoloid leukemia, after being ill for only three months. It was a horrible disease. It was bad enough losing my mother to it when she was 62; I cannot even begin to imagine what it must have been like for you to lose your darling daughter to it.

I used to give blood fairly regularly, but the last few times I've been turned down for one reason or another. Problem with my platelets, because I had a headache, anaemic etc. This thread has made me want to go back and try again.

Good luck to all of you who are struggling with nerves over this. smile

GreenEggsAndNichts Mon 21-Jan-13 23:55:05

I wish I could. I used to, when I was younger. Unfortunately those who have had a transfusion aren't allowed to give. I am sure if they removed this restriction, they would have more donors. Those of us who have received a transfusion know just how important the blood is!

Well done donors smile

They say you're not meant to donate for 9 months after giving birth, but I'm considering bending the truth (a little) to give after 6 months. My blood iron levels are now great so I don't think it's an overly risky thing to do. This will be donation number 20!! Have mentioned to my GP just to be sure though, and she agreed that she didn't know of any evidence contraindicating it.

This thread has reminded me to try to book an appointment smile

Ah, just reread the guidelines and it actually says to wait for 6 months now. No need for any guilt in booking to donate then - hurrah!

Rachc19 Tue 22-Jan-13 00:57:17

You can now give blood 6 months after giving birth.

boomting Tue 22-Jan-13 04:14:41

I would give blood, but unfortunately I can't for several different reasons, including having had a blood transfusion in the past and not meeting the minimum weight requirement (I'm just short, not underweight).

rockinhippy Tue 22-Jan-13 09:57:32

I would & have done in the past, but I'm not allowed anymore for medical reasons -

DH does but they don't make it easy for him, so I don't think they do themselves any favours at all, it used to beat a very accessible very central hotel, now it's a bus ride away on one side of town, not much help to people who have to work, or live the opposite side of town, especially when our parking is so bad & so expensive.

They also seem to have inexperienced training nurses up there, DH more often than not has come home in a mess - last time he was bruised almost the entire length of his inner arm & very sore too, not the first time they've done that either & he has veins that you would have to be blind to miss - dread to think how they cope with people with invisible veins like mine - its something he feels very strongly about doing & has always done it, but so far he hasn't been back as a result, so I dread to think how many more they have put off with the clinics current location & slap happy taking of blood sad

bottleofbeer Tue 22-Jan-13 10:03:34

TBH they're miserable sods at the one I go to.

rockinhippy Tue 22-Jan-13 10:04:54

& I agree its not conditional, when I could give, I wouldn't have wanted my blood to be available only to others who gave, its free for all who need smile

comixminx Tue 22-Jan-13 10:16:55

I haven't given recently as DS isn't yet six months old, but he's not far off that now so I will get a wiggle on once he is. I had quite a struggle getting accepted at first: quite a few times with low iron or having been abroad to the wrong place or whatever. In addition I was born in Brazil and my mum's Brazilian too so they had to test for Chaga's disease. I was worried I'd get through ll the other hurdles and then fail at that one! But luckily not, and I've given a few times, though not loads and loads. I am pleased though that when we got together I mentioned it to DP who had not got round to donating for many years; kick-started him back into going and he's been pretty regularly over the past five plus years!

Someone did mention it upthread but do drink water beforehand or while you're waiting, it makes a big difference to the plumpness of the veins in my case at least and I assume generally.

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