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To be really worried about this?

(52 Posts)
featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 12:43:04

We moved to our current (rented) home while I was pregnant with DC1, from a not very nice area, as DH and I wanted to raise our child in a quieter area, with more like-minded families as neighbours, and good schools. We're just off a 40mph dual carriageway, but not close enough that it's a problem. We found out today that a discount supermarket chain want to build a new store over the road - this would literally be the entire view from the front windows! There is another supermarket on the opposite corner, which has been there for yonks and is surrounded by 'community' shops including a hairdresser, florist, pharmacy, etc. I'm so worried about the possibility of this new supermarket, I've seen what's happened to other residential areas they've built branches in, and I don't want my lovely area to change! I'm going to object at every level/opportunity, but AIBU to worry so much? Does anyone have any similar experiences that turned out ok? As things stand, DH and I are anticipating another house move in the next year, before we have to submit nursery applications for DS. We're hoping to make a start on DC2 this year too!

Earlybird Sun 13-Jan-13 13:01:47

Don't worry about it.

Even if they get approval to build, you'll have moved before they open (though construction traffic will be a pain to deal with).

maddening Sun 13-Jan-13 13:07:48

Fighting a planning application takes a lot of time and sometimes reaources.

My parents live in their own home that backs on to countryside - there isn't even a supermarket (village shops in village centre - they've only just got a chippy as the parish council wouldn't approve one as it wouldn't fit the village ). A company is trying to get pp for 200 dwellings immediately behind their house so they would back on to gardens instead of countryside.

They have a big action group and have paid for a solicitor (village wide as there are 5 pp apps for over 600 dwellings where there are only 1200 dwellings currently) so far they have won (my parents and the village action group) but there is possibly no end to the fight.

You could speak to other residents to see if you could add to their campaign and let your ll know as it impacts their ability to let for the same value but if you are moving then I wouldn't put too much energy in to it - you won't lose financially as a home owner would with loss of value. The fact that therr is already a supermarket there could work either way - the precedent is set for that type of building but on the other hand it could be argued that the community doesn't need more supermarkets - the other supermarket is likely to oppose anyway.

StraightTalkinSheila Sun 13-Jan-13 13:10:29

Yes, you are. You rent and you'll move, probably, well before construction is completed if it even goes ahead. Bit of a waste of time to worry about this one, methinks.

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:13:51

Maybe should've made the point that this was meant to be a long-term rent, we don't actually want to move and had no plans to do so in the next several years!

Lollybrolly Sun 13-Jan-13 13:17:23

But the advanbtage of renting is that you CAN move. You can move alot easier than if you owned.

Its not ideal or part of the original plan but I would be looking at moving if this new supermarket was so off putting for me.

StraightTalkinSheila Sun 13-Jan-13 13:18:13

But you said you were going to move. I don't get it.

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:23:18

We're anticipating the new supermarket changing the area sufficiently for the worse that it won't fit the 'brief' we looked for when we were house-hunting any more. At the minute the area is exactly what we wanted, with this new supermarket and its knock-on effects it's unlikely to remain that way, so we'll have to either move or accept the changes - and it'll make our rent over the odds, but it'll not be reduced. Us renting is a slight red herring I suppose, it makes it easier for us to leave if necessary, but we really do think of this as our home, it's almost ideal and we don't want to leave!

JaneFonda Sun 13-Jan-13 13:24:51

As things stand, DH and I are anticipating another house move in the next year, before we have to submit nursery applications for DS.

Is this due to the possibility of the supermarket being there? I don't understand, why are you planning to move if you don't want to?

StraightTalkinSheila Sun 13-Jan-13 13:26:14

I think you have too much time on your hands. Blimey.

Earlybird Sun 13-Jan-13 13:28:18

Why do you feel you'd have to leave the area?

I can understand that maybe you don't want to live across the street from it, but surely a move to a less busy road in the same area would solve your problem?

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:34:50

Rentals aren't too common round here, but even if we found a perfect rental 2 streets away, the thought of moving again fills me with dread! And contrary to one rather pointless post, I have very little time on my hands - I work full time and I'm currently also doing 2 part time uni courses as well as trying to get some family time with DH and DS. I'm not sure if I can do all of that, TTC/be pregnant with DC2 and move house! Just because I rent doesn't mean I would find it easy to find somewhere else to live, pack up our whole lives and move house!

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:36:05

Jane, we aren't planning to move, we don't want to, but we want to live opposite this monstrosity and all the 'issues' it was bring to the area even less!

Earlybird Sun 13-Jan-13 13:39:01

In your shoes, I'd look to move.

Otherwise you will spend a lot of time and energy worrying about what might happen over the road. When/if it does, you will then be upset and then will want to move - but you will be that much more established in your current place. And personally, i'd not want to live across the road from the construction - noise, mud, lorries, increase in traffic, etc.

Take the short term 'pain' of another move in order to have the long term 'gain' of living somewhere peaceful. That will free you up to 'worry' about that things that really matter in your life! wink

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:45:04

I guess you're right - we'll wait to see if pp is approved ad start house-hunting again if it is. Oh, but the thought FILLS me with dread! I hate moving house and really thought we'd found somewhere that would at least see us through to kids-at-school days (2 very good schools nearby) hmm

Earlybird Sun 13-Jan-13 13:49:21

Of course it is upsetting when something potentially unpleasant and unanticipated happens.

But, the good thing is you have time to look around for a new place without pressure. Also, now that you are established in the area, you might have the 'inside track' so you can hear about upcoming rentals from your circle of friends/acquaintances.

Good luck.

WorraLiberty England Sun 13-Jan-13 13:49:31

But what if the person who owns your house wanted it back? Renting has no real long term guarantees as a rule.

Also, living so close to a dual carriageway, there will always been new industry moving in and out of the area.

Hindsight is a great thing I know but it's something you should have considered in the first place...that industrial units/supermarkets always pop up in places like that.

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:51:26

Worra, there was no indication when we moved here that there was a potential site to build on - they're talking about pulling down an existing residential complex, and today's the first anyone's heard about this happening!

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:54:09

And I know the LL could theoretically take back his house at any point, but without going into too much unnecessary detail, one of the attractions of this house was the extreme unlikelihood of this happening due to the LL's own set-up.

FiveGoMadInDorset Sun 13-Jan-13 13:54:42

Sto being a snob, you have no idea if it will effect the area or not.

deckthehouse Sun 13-Jan-13 13:55:46

I'm baffled, how will 'discount supermarket' change the area? Are you worried that there will be a rush of unemployed people moving in at the sight of a Farmhouse?

maddening Sun 13-Jan-13 13:56:54

Maybr wait and see if it does change the area.

As you suggest that it is mainly an area of owner occupiers then they have the motivation to fight this too - it is likrly they chose to live there for the same reason as you. If you want to stay then see if there is a local action group - you could help posting leaflets through doors to drum up awareness - they may hire a specialist solicitor who knows the moves to anticipate from the developrrs who have their own legal team working on it - so expertise on your side will help - they can tell you the best objection points you havr in your favour. Also - a basic list of points to add in the leaflets as you are asking everyone to write a letter of objection.

See if your parish council have a neighbourhood plan and see whether they are for or against this development.

My parents don't want to move - they've lived there over 30 years and have a lot vested in living there. Renting doesn't mean you care less or want to move but you are not financially vested there which is a good thing really if it does get the go ahead abd does negatively impact the area so you have options on your side smile

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:57:03

Hahaha, I'm about as far from a snob as you could hope to meet! grin But I've seen the effect this particular supermarket chain tends to have on residential areas it opens in, without exception it's negative and our main motive for moving here was to escape a bad area for DS's sake, we want to give him the best start we can even though we can't buy out own home. Is that really so snobby?

featherbag Sun 13-Jan-13 13:58:24

Thank you maddening, sound advice and I think that's going to be the best approach for us.

StraightTalkinSheila Sun 13-Jan-13 13:58:29

Why is this such a big issue for you? If you don't like it, you'll have to move. No need for the endless hand- wringing over it.

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