to think the way to double (at least) the amt of people on the organ donar list is..

(39 Posts)
BuddyTheChristmasElf Thu 22-Nov-12 22:21:25

to offer the option of having the remains returned ready cremated - so no undertaker costs to the family
Like they do if you donate to medical science

I'm considering the medical science route so that my family don't have funeral costs, and if organ donation offered that too I'd choose that instead

AIBU to think that it would work well?

An opt out system wouldn't give the state the right to your body. Consent from the next of kin still needs to be obtained even when someone is on the donor register and this wouldn't change with an opt out system.

I think opt out would be a good idea. A lot of people don't bother registering not because they are ideologically opposed but just because it isn't high on their to do list. The people who care enough to oppose donation would take the time to opt out.

BuddyTheChristmasElf Fri 23-Nov-12 19:18:04

AKiss how do you think an opt out register would make any difference to the number of NOKs that do or don't consent?

an opt IN register is a way of saying to NOKs "look, it WAS something he/she thought about"
but with an opt OUT it doesn't say anything to the NOK about whether the deceased ever gave it a second thougth IYKWIM

I do not believe that offering a financial incentive to traumatised relatives is morally acceptable.
Organ donation is the ultimate altruistic gift. May God bless all those who's selflessness has kept my family alive.

GhostShip Fri 23-Nov-12 19:21:27

Hope - they haven't got the right per say, because the person can opt out if they don't like it.

BuddyTheChristmasElf Fri 23-Nov-12 20:20:46

Sauvignon I wouldn't agree with an actual payment. Just a change in the way the remains are returned.

DameSaggarmakersbottomknocker Fri 23-Nov-12 20:25:18

So basically you would consider organ donation as a means of saving some cash rather than as a gift after death to save someone's life?

I'm also confused as to how an opt-out system would change anything at all, if the NOK still can refuse.

Paying for body disposal would constitute a payment.

ChippingInLovesAutumn Fri 23-Nov-12 23:31:21

I think that if you are prepared to accept a 'donation' then you should be prepared to be a donor (if you are able to be), basing your decision on a monetary return (cost of a cremation) is morally bankrupt.

BuddyTheChristmasElf Fri 23-Nov-12 23:36:03

chipping I've already said that I am as on the fence about receiving as I am about giving

But if I did choose to receive it wouldn't bother me why the donor donated, so long as there was choice involved

PelvicFloorClenchReminder Fri 23-Nov-12 23:36:03

Buddy by the time my mum died, nothing was donateable - that wasn't a myth. She spent her life on the organ donor list and was a passionate advocate of organ donation.

BuddyTheChristmasElf Fri 23-Nov-12 23:38:06

I said "rare" pelvic, not never!

my parent died after a period of multi organ failure, but there were still SOME tissues that could be used, even if not whole hearts/lungs etc, there are all sorts of tissues that can be donated

Kendodd Fri 23-Nov-12 23:49:41

I think it would put me off.

If one of my DCs died or my DH and somebody at the hospital asked if I would donate their organs and the hospital would pay for cremation I would feel like I was selling their body parts.

Maybe that's just me though.

BuddyTheChristmasElf Fri 23-Nov-12 23:51:40

Interesting Kendodd, but suppose it wasn't compulsary, just an option? would it still put you off even if you could choose to have the remains back un-cremated, just because other people could get them back cremated?

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