To be annoyed at the way my daughter's teacher handled a homework issue?

(64 Posts)
McGillycuddy Fri 16-Nov-12 20:28:30

My DD is 6 and in Yr 1. She was given maths homework last Friday to be handed in by this Tuesday. DH did homework with her and we sent it into school on Monday. So far so good. Yesterday DD came home in tears, her teacher had not seen the homework and threatened that she would miss 'play and learn' today if it was not done. Of course I spoke to the teacher this morning and said we had already handed it in, before it was even due! The teacher had a cursory look and found it in DD's tray. Anyway, my point is, even if we had not handed in the homework, would it not be more appropriate to speak to parents before handing out punishments to 6 year olds for unfinished homework? A 6 year old is not old enough to do homework on their own, they need parental support. Some children do not get that support at home, is it really fair to then punish them at school? The whole episode has made me angry, it does feel like an injustice, albeit a minor one. Should I bring this up with DD's teacher, or just let it lie?

Alisvolatpropiis Fri 16-Nov-12 21:59:29

Does it not? I'm not that familiar with primary school national curriculum. In essence I agree with you. There are so many ways to teach children at that age things without it being maths on a bit of paper and so on. It's a shame it's not considered as valid. As sure as I am I had homework at that age,I am also sure that my parents used toys and games to teach me outside of school. still awful at maths though

McGillycuddy Fri 16-Nov-12 22:02:35

I don't remember having any homework at 6. We had a bookbag thing that hung on the back of our chairs but we never took anything home. And I loved learning and did very well in the education system. I do worry sometimes that overdoing it when they are so young will kill all the joy of learning.

HumphreyCobbler Fri 16-Nov-12 22:05:00

I think this is not on for a Year 1 class. The homework was to play a game with an adult? I suppose all the children whose parents don't want to or don't care about the homework got punished then?

I am a teacher who taught Y1 for a long time. We used to set homework because the parents wanted us too (otherwise I wouldn't have done), and there was no sanction if it was not handed in. I think all the posters who are saying that the children have to learn to take responsibility are thinking of what is appropriate in a Year 3 class rather than Year 1.

Svrider Fri 16-Nov-12 22:06:36

Your going to have this entire year if she has two teachers
My dd 1 had this last year, including teacher 1 asking them to bring in toys, then getting told off by teacher 2 (toys not allowed)
Teacher 2 giving dd1 golden time tomorrow. Teacher 1 wouldn't believe her, and it was "too late" by Monday
I doubt either teacher bothered to tell your dd where to put her work angry

Welovecouscous Fri 16-Nov-12 22:07:43

I agree not Dunkirk - to continue the naval metaphor - keep your powder dry!

Rowlers Fri 16-Nov-12 22:10:08

Year 1? Honestly, what does it matter if they do "homework" or not? They should be enjoying going to school and PLAYING when they go home. I do not think a 6 year old should be responsible for anything other than being happy and being a child.
Childhood's too short.
If it were me, I'd talk to the teacher and let him / her know how upset my child was. I'd hope for a reassuring repsonse from the school.
I am a teacher myself and HATE it when parents go in all guns blazing. It's really not necessary.

ninah Fri 16-Nov-12 22:12:32

thanks McGc
I would worry if one of my dc didn't want to come to school! (crikey I have 30 dc!)
I went to a private primary, Gove would've loved it, Latin for breakfast
I don't remember being scared about homework per se but I DO remember being scared about putting the right date on work, the right tray, country dancing moves .... I burned out at about 13. Everything after that I taught myself. I do think pastoral is vital. Six is still v young. Hope she has a good weekend. Sounds like your teacher has high expectations, which is a good thing ... bolster with lots of love at home.

ninah Fri 16-Nov-12 22:15:18

I'm now in love with rowlers, welove and humprhey
and svr has a good point

Rowlers Fri 16-Nov-12 22:29:04

Also, I suspect the homework thing is a school policy and not just a rogue teacher making up his / her own rules. I could be wrong.
I do have a bit of an issue with primary school homework.
DS just started foundation so just comes home happy maybe with a Biff Chip Kipper book to read but DD now is Year 4 has, over the years, come home with a variety of taken-straight-from-a-photocopiable-book homework tasks which are at best mind-numbingly dull and at worst totally pointless and not at all motivating or inspiring.
Anyway, I agree that the main issue here is that children should LOVE going to school, and not be scared witless.
Ninah, Mwah love you too grin

McGillycuddy Fri 16-Nov-12 22:34:27

Thanks everyone smile Signing off now as eyes propped open with matchsticks. Feeling better for having 'talked' it out with you all. I think I will leave it be for now but keep a watchful eye on the situation. Was really good to hear from some teachers, so thank you all

blackeyedsusan Sat 17-Nov-12 00:07:38

yanbu. the teacher does not live in the real world. not got a clue how to handle small children to motivate them and get them to love learning, not got a clue about what real families go through, not got a clue about the support the children need at home at age 5 to do homework.

TheNebulousBoojum Sat 17-Nov-12 02:27:14

'What a nonsense giving six year olds homework apart from reading. This teacher doesn't sound very experienced.'

I think you will find that most schools have a homework policy that the teachers have to abide by, rather than being allowed to decide for themselves what to do about it. When I taught Y1, I set homework with a purpose and a time limit, but as I disagreed with the policy of homework for infants beyond reading, I praised those that did it and didn't chase it up.

TheNebulousBoojum Sat 17-Nov-12 02:28:45

Oh, and many teachers have a job and a family and are fully aware of the real world, balancing family and work needs, including homework, Susan. What a daft comment.

LIZS Sat 17-Nov-12 11:06:03

but, assuming I've read this correctly, the teacher was suggesting that those children who hadn't completed the task at home would do so duing play and learn time. The homework was a learning game and presumably the teacher or TA would substitute for the parent role or children work as a group. It therefore wasn't a punishment as such, just an opportunity to do some guided learning through play. Presumably your dd has completed all tasks set on time before now but this might simply be regular catch up time allocated for those who don't. Not worth being so angry over, save that for when it really matters.

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