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To think that this woman should have at least said sorry and offered to pay for broken item.

(81 Posts)
Fakebook Mon 12-Nov-12 13:45:57

Was in Tesco this morning and looking at their Tupperware because dd loses the lids in school almost everyday. Anyway suddenly there was a massive crash. I looked to the right and a little boy had thrown 3 ceramic bowls on the floor and they had all broken to smithereens. His mother exclaimed "oh noo" and stood and stared at the mess. A customer assistant came and began picking up the mess and then another came and began sweeping.

During this time, the woman didn't even say sorry and calmly carried on browsing with her son lingering behind her like nothing had happened.

AIBU to think she should have apologised profusely and then offered to pay for the bowls that her little angel had just broken? She didn't even tell him off! If my dd had done that I would have done a proper kneeling down, eye contact, stern voice telling off super nanny stylee!

I'd be more likely to be aghast if the OP actually saw what happened tbh. I tend to avoid judging anyone tbh unless the facts are very clear as I so often get judged by the daft and judgemental half looking when out with ds1. It's given me an aversion to making assumptions. Without seeing exactly what went on (which the OP clearly didn't) you can't tell whether the mother behaved reasonably or not. I do tend to get irritated by assumptions.

I wound have thanked whoever cleared it up, and found someone to call the cleaning staff if no-one appeared. That's it. I wouldn't necessarily have told my child off - depends how the bowls ended up on the floor.

ontheedgeofwhatever Tue 13-Nov-12 09:28:36

DD broke a mug in Starbucks once (one of the ones on shelf for sale not one they served coffee in). I'm afraid it was at the end of a very exhausting shopping trip during which she'd played up as much as possible and to my eternal shame I really screamed and shouted at her and she burst into floods of tears.

I apologised to staff and made her apologise too but they were lovely. They cleaned everything up and gave her a lollipop and some marshmallows I think they felt sorry for her having such a horrid mummy blush they refused to let me pay for it either.

YANBU at the very least she should have been apologetic

Hopeforever Tue 13-Nov-12 10:38:37

saintlyjimjams so glad I am not alone in not wanting to jump straight into judging what is not proven.

Guilty until proved innocent has become law perhaps?

SoupDragon Tue 13-Nov-12 10:44:57

Guilty until proved innocent has become law perhaps?

You do get that this is just an internet forum, you know where people just chat? The Op didn't march up to the woman and lay into her, nor did she frog march her off to the police station or put up a "wanted" poster all round town.

I am more than happy to judge her for not apologising though - that's just plain rude.

Fakebook - this says it all, for me:

"Even if you knock something off by accident, a simple "sorry" doesn't cost money."

In my opinion, there is NO excuse for bad manners - and not apologising was bad manners.

adeucalione Tue 13-Nov-12 11:02:12

I don't really see how there is anything to debate here.

Even if the bowls were broken accidentally, by a child with co-ordination difficulties, at the end of a hellish day, then the accompanying adult - no matter how poor, embarrassed or stressed - should have said 'sorry' and 'thank you for clearing this up'.

Even if the OP didn't see what happened immediately prior to the crash, she saw what happened straight afterwards and the woman's response does seem unusual and rude.

Amazing that several posters think that you don't have to apologise if you are embarrassed about something, don't have to offer to pay for breakages if you are in a large store, and don't have to correct a young child's behaviour immediately after they do something that you (presumably) don't want them to do again.

The only way that OP would BU is if the bowls fell to the floor independently of anyone touching them, but as she saw the immediate response of the woman and the child, she is presumably able to judge that they were to blame; the only time that a display spontaneously collapsed as DH and I walked by we looked shocked, burst out laughing and told everyone in the vicinity that it wasn't us.

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