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to ask you all to please help me out here. My mother is insisting this is true ...

(95 Posts)
fluffyraggies Tue 09-Oct-12 16:40:44

..... that if you get hospital treatment as a result of a traffic accident you have to PAY for it. And if you cant pay for it you have have to claim off your car insurance.

Ay ???????

I have never in all my days heard this ?!?!? I was confused and hmm when she said it.

I've been driving for years and have always sorted my own car insurance and have never ever come across this in any of the paper work. She doesn't drive and never has. But she is adamant she's correct on this.

Am i being really thick here?

jerryfudd Tue 09-Oct-12 17:00:12

As far as I am aware, if someone makes a claim for personal injuries as a result of a traffic accident accident the parties (usually the one going to be paying out) have to notify the cru (compensation recovery unit) who will issue a certificate which shows how much has to be repaid out of damages for any benefits paid as a result ie if you are claiming loss of earnings from responsible party but claimed from state whilst out of work as result of accident then any sums claimed gets deducted from the loss of earnings recovery. On the same form is a tick box indicating whether any hospital treatment had following accident and if ticked yes the cru will pursue "rta charges" from paying insurer. I can't remember whether it was £175 or £375 though

RandallPinkFloyd Tue 09-Oct-12 17:00:29

Blimey!

I knew about the ambulance thing but not that last bit! shock

I know the first doctor on scene is entitled to bill for his services but I've never known one actually do it.

NatashaBee Tue 09-Oct-12 17:00:43

Yes, it's true - my sister got knocked off her bike and my parents got a bill! She was taken in in an ambulance with concussion - so not like it wasn't serious enough to warrant an ambulance. The sum was somewhere around the 21.30 mentioned above.

jerryfudd Tue 09-Oct-12 17:01:49

Post crossed with fluffy

7to25 Tue 09-Oct-12 17:03:46

the NHS can charge via the insurance
I was in a collision with an insured driver going the wrong way down the motorway and his insurance paid for some of my hospital stay (NHS)

Tinuviel Tue 09-Oct-12 17:20:57

A kid ran into the side of my mum's car in the late 1970s and she was sent the bill for the ambulance. I seem to remember it was £11. She was very annoyed as he had run straight out into the road and dented the back door of her car (so he had hit her rather than the other way round) but as the driver she was automatically deemed to have been 'at fault'. Fortunately for him, she was driving very slowly as he had got off the same bus as my brother and as it was raining, she had slowed down ready to stop and give DB a lift.

I seem to remember a few years later my DB being in a car that went off the road and the driver was sent a bill for £55 as there were 5 people in the car - only 1 ambulance though!

eileenf Tue 09-Oct-12 17:37:03

RTA charges have been recoverable from drivers insurance for many many years - since before the NHS existed in fact (1934).

OldCatLady Tue 09-Oct-12 17:41:41

Errrmmm well last year I had a car accident, totally my fault, I got taken to hospital in an ambulance and treated there...never got a bill! Never heard of such a thing!

fluffyraggies Tue 09-Oct-12 17:56:37

Thank you for all your input - i knew nothing of any of this!

Well it seems such a hit and miss affair though (genuinely no pun intended) as to whether you get billed. £20 to £30 for an ambulance - fair enough i suppose. But i'm surprised car ins. covers treatment. It seems so random ...

I'm really flaberghasted (sp?) in fact.

You can get billed for the ambulance if they don't think it was needed

My exp got billed for a lamp post £1000

jamdonut Tue 09-Oct-12 18:18:42

This has been around for years...I thought it was common knowledge that you can be charged ,particularly after a traffic accident, for an ambulance? Not that it has ever happened to me,but I used to work in an NHS hospital (clerical staff).

carabos Tue 09-Oct-12 18:30:46

My DM was in an accident a few years ago - she was charged for the ambulance and had to pay it as she was hit by an uninsured driver.

clam Tue 09-Oct-12 18:34:50

My brother was charged for his ambulance - no false alarms there! The paramedics took one look at his car (which had skidded on ice, someraulted over a barrier and down an embankment and ended up headfirst in a treetrunk) and said "that poor bugger's had it" and then realised he was still alive and they leapt into action to rescue him.

He still had to pay. Is it fair to assume that all those who say it's rubbish, haven't ever tested it out?

FryOneGhoulishGhostlyManic Tue 09-Oct-12 18:36:21

There are large signs all over our GP surgery stating that under the Road TRaffic Act they can make charges for treatment received as a result of a road traffic accident. Whether they do charge is another matter entirely.

We are in the Midlands.

ChaoticismyLife Tue 09-Oct-12 18:41:37

Years ago my ex was in an accident, he skidded on ice, on the way home from work early christmas day morning. He went to A&E later on in the day where he was diagnosed with whiplash. He was sent a bill later in the post.

Your mum is correct OP. I think it's the person who is found to have caused the accident - the most negligent driver etc.

MissHuffy Tue 09-Oct-12 18:47:59

I've been billed by A&E although I think it was a "standard fee" and didn't reflect the treatment.

Now, being charged for A&E in US was a whooooole different thing!!

spoonsspoonsspoons Tue 09-Oct-12 18:48:38

Took friends to A&E when they'd put their car in a ditch when we were in sixth form. They had to pay a sum at the hospital (about 15 quid) as it was a result of a road traffic accident (no ambulance involved).

ginmakesitallok Tue 09-Oct-12 18:50:23

Yes NHS can recoup costs from insurers as far as I know - but they wouldn't bill an individual I think?

McHappyPants2012 Tue 09-Oct-12 18:54:17

Yes she is right

I have never heard of this before shock I am genuinely shocked that people who have had car accidents are billed for the ambulance <incredulous>

KenLeeeeeee Tue 09-Oct-12 18:56:34

Never heard of anything like this about hospital treatment, but there was something in the news the other days about RTA victims being billed for by the companies the Highways Agency use to clear the roads after an accident or breakdown.

Lemme find the link...

Here we go: www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19833237

piratecat Tue 09-Oct-12 18:59:52

was involved in a car prang yrs ago, and the driver got the bill for the ambulance we went in. Accident was his fault, we didn't have any bad injuries.

neverputasockinatoaster Tue 09-Oct-12 19:07:23

I have been to A and E twice as a result of an RTA. The first time I was the driver (not my fault) and the second time I was a passenger (not the driver's fault).

The first time I was charged under the RTA but told to pass the bill to my insuance company. The guy who hit me paid the bill ( or rather his insurers did).

The second time my friend got a bill. Her insurance company passed it on to the woman who hit her. No ambulance was needed either time.

mrsrosieb Tue 09-Oct-12 19:18:31

I worked in an A&E for 3 years. No-one was ever charged for ambulance transport-even one woman who commanded an ambulance for breaking a false nail!
One guy came in 3 times with a broken leg, only to miraculously get off the stretcher and walk off. After a police investigation it turned out he lived near the hospital and called an ambulance as a taxi home following a night out in the pub. Even he did not get charged for the ambulance-although he did end up on community service.

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