Philippa Gregory. Any order for her books

(13 Posts)
MrsReacher Thu 27-Jun-13 22:05:27

I'm thinking of giving Philippa Gregory a try after quite enjoying The White Queen (I know very little about this period of history which probably helps) Are her books stand alone or would I be better reading them in any order

They are a complete change to the kind of books I normally read so I am only going to download one to begin with. Any recommendations as to a good one to start with

Thanks

I think there is an order, I nearly bought the red queen today which I think is next but I think I might wait a bit as I have also just finished the white queen and it was quite brain zapping!

In fact I am sure there is an order because on amazon they are numbered!

highlandcoo Thu 27-Jun-13 22:29:26

I think they come in groups. You could have a look at PG's official website to find out more.

I enjoyed the Boleyn trilogy which starts with The Constant Princess, the story of the early life of Catherine of Aragon. Followed by The Other Boleyn Girl and finally The Boleyn Inheritance. I read all three during one summer holiday and got really immersed in the Tudor court.

If you'd like to try one stand-alone book, A Respectable Trade, dealing with the slave trade in 18th century England, is a good read.

Shenanagins Thu 27-Jun-13 22:36:43

These books are part of a series with all three stories intertwined as being depicted in the white queen tv series.

The order they were published was, the white queen, the red queen, the kingmaker's daughter. In addition to these there is lady of the rivers telling the story of the white queen's mother.

LadyDamerel Thu 27-Jun-13 22:42:51

They do have a historical order.

The recent trilogy is White Queen (Elizabeth Woodville/Edward IV), Red Queen (Margaret Beaufort/Henry VII) then Kingmaker's Daughter (Anne Neville/Edward IV/Richard III) which overlaps both but will probably make more sense if you've read the other two first.

The Tudor series is in the order Highlandcoo gives, then is followed by The Queen's Fool (Mary/Elizabeth I as a princess) then The Virgin's Lover (Elizabeth I) and finally The Other Queen (Mary, Queen of Scots).

Obviously Henry VII was Henry VIII's dad so chronologically you've started right at the beginning!

It probably helps that you don't know much about the actual history because they're not particularly accurate in places, especially the most recent three. The Tudor ones are more carefully researched, imo. She seems to be churning them out at a rate of knots these days and the quality is definitely suffering.

MrsReacher Thu 27-Jun-13 22:54:55

Thanks all. That helps a lot. I think I'll start with the Tudor series first of all rather than overlapping The White Queen TV series with the book's

I'm not great on the history so probably won't notice the inaccuracies and I won't have my Dsis to point them out unlike in the TV seriessmile

LadyDamerel Thu 27-Jun-13 23:31:40

grin DH got cross with me for shouting at the TV during the first episode.

To be fair, the TV series isn't as bad as the Hollywood version of The Other Boleyn Girl, which I turned off in disgust after an hour!

juneybean Fri 28-Jun-13 10:31:34

I thought the Lady of the Rivers came first

LadyDamerel Sat 29-Jun-13 21:42:16

Is Lady of the Rivers about Jacquetta Woodville? I haven't come across it, but if it is then chro

LadyDamerel Sat 29-Jun-13 21:42:28

Stupid blink

LadyDamerel Sat 29-Jun-13 21:44:56

Grrr!

Stupid blinking phone.

If it is, then chronologically it does come before The White Queen.

Yes, Lady of the Rivers is about Jacquetta of Luxembourg, who went on to be Lady Rivers and the mother of Elizabeth Woodville, Queen of Edward IV. Their first child, Elizabeth of York, was the wife of Henry VII and mother of Henry VIII.

sugarandspite Sat 29-Jun-13 21:55:08

The White Princess is out on 23rd July too - its the story of Elizabeth woodville's eldest daughter Princess Elizabeth of York who marries Henry Tudor (Henry VII) and is mother to Henry VIII. It bridges the gap between the cousins wars series and the Tudor series.

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