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Teachers Strike on 10th July....

(198 Posts)
Sparklingbrook Wed 02-Jul-14 18:13:29

Just had a text from school. DS2 ( all of Year 7) off. I hadn't heard there was going to be a strike. confused

KnackeredMuchly Thu 03-Jul-14 13:10:18

Incywincy, teachers also work during their holidays.

JustAShopGirl Thu 03-Jul-14 13:18:01

Ours is open due to it being activities week - most school trips happen this week, and the teachers have very nicely decided not to disrupt that for the children. It is most appreciated (and we have let the school know that).

Scousadelic Thu 03-Jul-14 13:20:43

Does that mean the NHS will be involved too? I'm not a member of Unison myself but haven't heard anything via work

ComeHeather Thu 03-Jul-14 13:21:22

My DS teacher is striking. Good for her I said. It's good for children to see people standing up for what they believe in.

Union action in the past gave women fair pay, maternity rights, safe workplaces etc etc.

I hope the strike has a positive effect.

offtoseethewizard64 Thu 03-Jul-14 13:22:24

DSs school definitely shut. Still waiting to hear about DDs but they did send a letter out as advance warning that they might be shut so that parents could make arrangements.

PinkSquash Thu 03-Jul-14 13:23:11

FBU is striking too, our school has an open evening then, doubt it'll be going on now.

Philoslothy Thu 03-Jul-14 13:26:18

Ours is open due to it being activities week - most school trips happen this week, and the teachers have very nicely decided not to disrupt that for the children. It is most appreciated (and we have let the school know that).

I would not be amused if my children's teachers did not put the long term interests of education ahead of a day's pay and activities for this year.

JustAShopGirl Thu 03-Jul-14 14:16:10

My DD is in Paris next week - 7th to 11th. Do you suggest

1. the 3 striking-union members strike leaving one non-striking-union member in charge of 40 kids on the 10th.

2. we chalk up the loss of £400 trip cost and £70 passport cost and a year's anticipation for my DD to experience and they cancel the trip at this late stage.

3. the union members take advice from their union and carry on due to the high potential cost - both monetarily and reputation-ally.

I'm sure they would have gone on strike if the union had insisted it was the only course of action, or if they thought it would best serve the long term interests of education (and the union itself).

However, gifting the press a stick to beat them with is not deemed to be in their best interests, the trips will go ahead, and we parents are grateful.

incywincyspideragain Thu 03-Jul-14 16:37:54

oodlives and knackered fear not I googled it all!
I am in agreement with teachers not having to work till 68 and protecting their pensions and pay rises
I disagree however that they should not have performance related pay and would also question that all teachers work during their holidays, especially since by definition they are working shift work cramming in more hours than most into the weeks they work, some do some don't, as in all professions
Either way I agree they will only get listened to if this kind of action is taken, I'm lucky I can be off work and sympathetic to those who will find this incredibly difficult x

emma123456 Thu 03-Jul-14 16:45:03

So who should work to 68? Who should pay more into their pensions? It's the same for all of us. 65 was the accepted retiral age when people were dying in their 70s. Now more and more people are enjoying 30 odd years of retirement. We simply can't afford to retire at 65, private or public sector.

LadyWithLapdog Thu 03-Jul-14 16:52:39

What's wrong with enjoying 30 odd years of retirement? Is it the enjoying part you object to? Fear not, many won't reach it with the workload and stress.

noblegiraffe Thu 03-Jul-14 19:02:28

Incy, do you understand why teachers object to performance related pay? (which we have anyway after the first 6 years).

It's not because teachers think that good performance should go unrewarded, it's because they know that it will be used unfairly by schools to keep staffing costs down (oh dear, haven't you met your completely unreasonable target? No pay rise for you) and also because how do you measure teacher performance? (Oh look, my top set all achieved their target grade, pay rise for me. Your bottom set of kids who barely turn up due to college placements/exclusions/school refusal/life-limiting illness haven't met their targets? Shame, no pay rise for you).

emma123456 Thu 03-Jul-14 20:45:33

Nothing is wrong with 30years of retirement if you can afford it. The country can't. The private sector can't. That's the reality.

Oodlives Thu 03-Jul-14 20:50:06

Is it likely to be 30 years after 68 (+ as it's still going up) for a teacher/social worker/care worker etc? There's been research into how many head teachers die not long after retirement. Stressful jobs affect health.

Goblinchild Thu 03-Jul-14 20:54:33

Wouldn't mind performance-related pay if the raw materials were consistent across the country and we had quality control. Possibly from birth? hmm
Want an award-winning sausage factory? Give us all the same ingredients and see what we do with them, then see who wins prizes.
Don't know what the state would do with the rejects though.

fancyacupoftea Thu 03-Jul-14 20:56:14

I would not be amused if my children's teachers did not put the long term interests of education ahead of a day's pay and activities for this year.

this

BrokenButNotFinished Thu 03-Jul-14 20:57:23

It will be transfer day here. No idea how they're going to manage it. Neither, currently, does the Head...

Pinkelephanty Thu 03-Jul-14 21:00:24

We've been told ours might be closed but it's not been confirmed yet.

MissPricklePants Thu 03-Jul-14 21:05:05

DDs school is closed, the school I work in is also closed. I'm a TA and most of the TAs are out. The union members in my school are all out as we feel it is the best thing to do!

bloodyteenagers Thu 03-Jul-14 21:13:45

Our school has decided to stay open. Not sure how that's going to work with little or no staff confused think management is trying to guilt trip staff..

WannaSplitAPineapple Thu 03-Jul-14 21:20:37

scousadelic unison are certainly striking within the NHS. I haven't heard anything from our trust about it but speaking to a local rep they are walking out. I'm going to as we don't even get our 1% payrise if we are entitled to our increment which we aren't even guaranteed to get. Our trust has various stipulations one of which being you can't have had more than 2 absences in a 12 month period which doesn't sound too bad unless you factor in long term illnesses where people may need more time off than the allowed two.

IamRechargingthankYou Thu 03-Jul-14 21:24:16

I know an issue is that so many teachers quit after 5 years - is there any research about how many have had dc about the same time, I do think that this may be a reason for the 'quitting' and deserves some research as a distinct variable irrespective on any other reasons.

Nonie241419 Thu 03-Jul-14 21:27:19

My school is shutting to pupils but I have to go to work as I'm NASUWT. Haven't heard anything from my DC's school yet.

Bearfrills Thu 03-Jul-14 21:28:36

It doesn't matter if people are living longer, 68 is sixty eight and by this age around 58% of people have a long-standing health problem. By age 68 it's likely that reactions are slower, energy levels are lower, the immune system isn't as strong, joints aren't as supple, hearing and sight may be deteriorating. Raising the retirement age doesn't magically restore vitality or youth. I wouldn't want DS in the care of someone with declining health who has been forced to carry on working. In addition, what sort of retirement is that for the person retiring into an extended period of ill/declining health? Surely part of the 'reward' for working for 30-40 years and contributing is that you actually get to enjoy at least part of your retirement.

(And I realise that not everyone is like this at age 68 before anyone calls me ageist).

ComeHeather Spain Thu 03-Jul-14 13:21:22
My DS teacher is striking. Good for her I said. It's good for children to see people standing up for what they believe in.

Union action in the past gave women fair pay, maternity rights, safe workplaces etc etc.

I hope the strike has a positive effect.

I doubt it will have a positive effect. In my area, people are already lining up to shoot the messenger. Any message they want to put out there is being lost.

And while I have some sympathy for their aims, I am already struggling to have enough child care for school holidays, even with DP and I taking most of our leave at separate times to maximise the time we have available to care for our DCs.

This year, we'll only have one week when we are all off together as a family. An extra unexpected day is hard to arrange care for.

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