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Shallow parenting question - hairstyles for toddlers

(21 Posts)
abigboydidit Tue 24-Jun-14 09:42:50

I am having fringe angst wink DS is 3 and has longish hair (collar length) in a sort of shaggy bowl cut, with a fringe. His hair is thick and straight. DD is 1.5 years and has really fine hair still but she seems to have inherited my curls. However, it isn't curly at the roots and basically is just in tight ringlets from level with her ear lobes. I have awful memories of having a fringe with curly hair as a child and was determined not to cut one in for her but even with a clasp holding it to the side, her hair is so fine that she always looks like she's been dragged through a hedge shock My friend is a barber and tells me I should wait it out as fringes are notorious for looking rubbish unless you have DSs hair type but I am not convinced it can look much worse! The girl who cut DDs hair last time was happy to cut one in if I asked but I wasn't very impressed by her and won't be going back. I realise that none of this really matters smile but I would appreciate any advice or experiences before I go for the chop!

KingJoffreysBloodshotEye Tue 24-Jun-14 09:54:34

Toddlers nearly always look like they've been dragged through a hedge.

Trying to make a toddler look anything other than a juice dribbley, yoghurt and chocolate smeared, paint stained smudge is the very definition of futility.

Have no fringe advice, just wanted you to feel better.

smile

lucysmam Tue 24-Jun-14 09:56:06

I have a little curly wurly girl & yep, dragged through hedge backwards is a popular look in our house grin

On a practical note, have you tried dampening her hair with one of those water spray guns or running wet fingers through it then brushing/putting a bobble in. My dd's hair tends to stay put a bit better if it's slightly damp to start with. Once it's up, I use six slides (three each side) to try and pin the fuzzy bits down a little smile

beccajoh Tue 24-Jun-14 10:01:30

My toddler's hair never looks good either and I don't know what to do about it. The bulk of her hair sweeps forward from the top of the back of her head (is that the crown?) like it's some giant sort of comb over. The hair round the sides and back goes into little ringlets, which it think is adorable envy but it's all different lengths and she has more hair on one side than the other.

There's also lots of new hair growing through underneath, so I'm seriously considering keeping her hair shorter in a pixie crop until it's a useful sort of thickness to grow a bit longer.

No advice but some sympathy!

Skivvywoman Tue 24-Jun-14 10:05:18

My dd is 9 now but has very curly hair and has never had a fringe hair, when she was a baby and needed to be out her eyes I swept it to the side with a clasp

And every morning just used to spray with some water to calm the bed head and comb through with a wide toothed comb never a brush

MiaowTheCat Tue 24-Jun-14 10:06:29

Short term crisis measure with DD1 - she's got a fringe cut in as her hair is so horrifically fine you can't keep a hair clip or anything in it as it'll just slide out (and she'll take it out if it doesn't). Poor kid's inherited my hair type which is just absolutely baby fine and a bugger to deal with. Hoping as she gets a bit older and more cooperative (hah hah) in terms of leaving hair slides alone and whatever we can get shot of the fringe but it's the best solution in the interim.

I'd like to describe her as having more of a Helena Bonham-Carter vibe going on than dragged through a hedge backwards - but the hedge covers it as well.

All the other little girls her age have beautiful bunches in and look well presented - mine has hair like a haystack, mucky knees with grazes and bruises where the muck has missed and is generally the loudest child in a 10 mile radius. I'd like to think I'm doing the toddler thing right!

eightyearsonhere Tue 24-Jun-14 10:09:37

i thought my toddler has terrible hair.
but then i discovered the Harlow Topnotgrin grin
now strangers, ok well old women, stop us in the street to admire her.
that hair style is seriously cute, might it work for your daughter?

AndHarry Tue 24-Jun-14 10:10:11

I've got a curly-headed 1.5yo DD and her hair is on the dragged-through-hedge side too. I'm not cutting in a fringe as I have painful memories of trying to grow mine out as a tween, plus her hair is so curly it would look ridiculous. I only brush her hair when it's wet (comb it through when I put in conditioner) and then use a few squirts of serum to stop it getting too bad. During the day I either clip it back by twisting it and putting a clip in or tie it up in bunches.

abigboydidit Tue 24-Jun-14 10:13:41

Thanks for the reassurances and advice smile DDs hair also does that mad comb over thing on top, so I reckon a water spray and more clips may be the way forward. She actually leaves the clip alone but I have only been using one of those tiny clicky ones as anything bigger or kirby-like slides out. It inevitably doesn't hold her hair away from her eyes and it gets stuck on the snot under her nose. Always a good look shock

Shedding Tue 24-Jun-14 10:15:56

Sounds like perhaps the curls are growing out and were just baby hair? I think the pixie cut is a lovely idea, I wish I had done this with dd3 who had fine hair. Dd1 and 2 had so much hair that I think dd3 just confused me and I let it grow all scraggy mullet before sorting it out.

Yep, I have no fringe advise, no idea, really. But toddlers usually look amazing with their dragged through a hedge look!

beccajoh Tue 24-Jun-14 10:17:35

Eightyearshere, do you mean when you tie the hair up on top of their head? I do that with DD sometimes and yes it does look cute! Although I just gather it up and put an elastic round it so the ends of the hair are all sticking up. She looks more baby-ish that way too, which I like blush Desperate for her not to grow up blushblush

abigboydidit Tue 24-Jun-14 10:19:24

Am not sure. When it's newly washed it all curls but because it is so fine, when she walkes in the morning it is just a mad swirl on top then curly at the ends. It then bounces up more as the day goes on. I am intrigued by a Harlow Topknot eightyearsonhere. What is that?!

strawberrysplit Tue 24-Jun-14 10:35:20

DD has crazy ringlets and hers grow longer right over her eyes...my 4 year old has curls but just at the ends so she's got a fringe but I daren't with dd2, the curls are too tight, they're still curls when her hair's sopping wet!

I use the tiny elastics you can get from clare's as they're the only thing that holds it, she hated them at first but couldn't pull them all of the way out as they grip really well. I normally tie the front up on top of her head or to one side with one of these then put a pretty flower or bow clip just in front of the bobble to stop it flopping forward at all smile the rest is the usual crazy curly mess unless I'm feeling strong enough to wrestle her into pigtails, even then we have escaped curls within half an hour anyway!

HighwayDragon Tue 24-Jun-14 10:41:14

buy some hair bubbles, jobs a good'un

PrueDent Tue 24-Jun-14 10:48:27

My toddler (2.1) has straight hair, worn in the dragged-through-hedge style. MiL keeps telling me to get a fringe cut but I'm digging in my heels. Her hair grows forward from the crown and cutting a fringe would involve either cutting all the top, leaving her with a mullet (eek!), or cutting some at the front and letting the longer hair from the back hang over (again, eek!).

So no. Her hair will be left until it's long enough to style. Clips or bobbles will control it until then. When she has enough hair to mess about with we can decide whether to cut in a fringe, or see if she suits without.

PrueDent Tue 24-Jun-14 10:51:15

My toddler (2.1) has straight hair, worn in the dragged-through-hedge style. MiL keeps telling me to get a fringe cut but I'm digging in my heels. Her hair grows forward from the crown and cutting a fringe would involve either cutting all the top, leaving her with a mullet (eek!), or cutting some at the front and letting the longer hair from the back hang over (again, eek!).

So no. Her hair will be left until it's long enough to style. Clips or bobbles will control it until then. When she has enough hair to mess about with we can decide whether to cut in a fringe, or see if she suits without.

Needaninsight Tue 24-Jun-14 10:57:42

My toddler has awful hair too!

Very very fine, and the whole thing falls forward, straight, like an enormous fringe. The sides have never grown. The back is long ish - so it looks like a giant mullet. She won't keep slides in sadly.

If I make her cry (!) i can put her hair in two pigtails, and sweep up some of the huge fringe in them. She looks really cute like that. But tbh, most days, I don't want the tears off her, bless her. (she cries because she hates me doing it, not because i"m hurting her, I might add!!!) Tried the Harper top knot, but her ears are too big, and it makes them look huge.

No advice, sorry, just sympathy!

abigboydidit Tue 24-Jun-14 11:32:18

It is reassuring to know am not alone smile

Purpleroxy Tue 24-Jun-14 11:37:28

With your dd, I would get the hair cut relatively short all over regularly to thicken and strengthen it. My dd is now 6 but when she was 2/3/4 I had it cut all the time and this kept it out of her face with no clips or bands and now that she is 6, she can manage it herself and it's thick and strong and longer. It was finer when she was younger.

MagnificentMaleficent Tue 24-Jun-14 11:40:44

My hairdresser said that as their hair grows forward until they are out of toddlerhood you are limited in options.

I had a fringe cut into DD1 's hair, thick and curly, and it was a bloody nightmare (normal hairdresser selfishly on ML wink ). Have perservered with DD2 and although she has lots of fine curly hair, she's 3 now and it will go into two plaits and so looks tidy - when she leaves the house.

Whatever I do to her she looks a shambles on return.

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