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Tips to get my 2.1 year old son off his dummy

(30 Posts)
ItsSoooFluffy Thu 30-Jan-14 10:40:13

Hi all, just wondering what tips any of you have to help me wean my 2.1 DS off his dummy? He is rather attached to ithmm and please no mean comments. His speech hasn't been affected nor his teeth but I know they may be if I don't get him to stop using themsad

It is a comfort - only give it to him at bedtime.

Both of mine were heavily attached to their dummies but both grew out of it.

Is it really a problem?

ItsSoooFluffy Thu 30-Jan-14 10:45:23

I feel a lot of pressure to get him off his dummy. hmm

Hoppinggreen Thu 30-Jan-14 10:49:32

From who?
I thought my DD would end up taking hers to school!!
She only had it in bed and just decided on her own aged 4 that she didn't want it anymore . She's got lovely teeth and speaks perfectly by the way.
Unless you really think there a good reason then let him keep if

PedlarsSpanner Thu 30-Jan-14 10:53:35

Do try sleep time only

if he won't accept this then cold turkey I'm afraid

You are right to be concerned particularly if he likes to use it through the day, yes to possible impact on speech and oral development

blackteaplease Thu 30-Jan-14 10:56:31

We cut down to sleep and naps only then when dd was 2.5 we bribed her with a doctors set. It was surprisingly easy. Only once did she ask for her dummy and offered to swap back her dr set but after a few tears that night it was fine.

I was dreading it as it was a big source of comfort to her but all was fine.

mrsjay Thu 30-Jan-14 10:58:50

right iI am another who thought dd would start school with her dummy hidden in her blazer pocket grin what i did was just took it from her until she was going for a nap or sitting watching tv or having a hug so it was used as a comfort I didnt let her talk with it in her speech was amazing btw I would say sorry i cant hear you take it out , I then gradually didnt give her it in the morning put it away till bedtime she still had it for bed till she was nearly 4, again it didnt affect her speech or her teeth who is putting you under pressure ?

ItsSoooFluffy Thu 30-Jan-14 12:02:52

A lot of people are putting the pressure on me. My OH tells me off if he sees I have let him have itsad also my health visitor when we saw her just before Christmas was saying I should get him off it, I also get remarks from people about it. It's made me a bit paranoid to say the least! I am dreading it a lot as his dummy is a big comfort for him.

No advice, but my 16mo is a dummy addict and we were thinking of weaning her off it when she gets nearer 2yo, so I'm interested to hear others' advice.

I know people who've had success with the 'dummy fairy'. You and DS gather the dummies up into a bag, and during the night the dummy fairy takes them away and leaves a present. If he wants a dummy back later on, he has to give up the present.

I suppose my feeling is that the longer it's left, that harder it might be to stop? But best to wait until they're old enough that you can explain it imo, hence my choosing 2yo ish.

notnowbernard Thu 30-Jan-14 12:10:48

Cold Turkey was the only way with mine

They were just 3 when I got rid of the dummy, had it for sleep time only by then

freckledleopard Thu 30-Jan-14 12:11:58

I did cold turkey with DD. Told her the dummy fairy had been and had taken the dummies, but left ice cream for her. She happily accepted it.

Marcipex Thu 30-Jan-14 12:13:31

I think a few tears the first night is normal, it should quickly be forgotten though.
I would withdraw it gradually in day time, unless he is poorly if course, when I'd wait a couple of days.

wakemeupnow Thu 30-Jan-14 12:16:42

Chuck them all away ... 2 days max of grief and it will be all over smile

ItsSoooFluffy Thu 30-Jan-14 12:26:39

Thank you for all your advice everyone, I thought I was going to get flamed. smile

ItsSoooFluffy Thu 30-Jan-14 12:29:23

I think I may try cold turkey as he's too young just now to understand the concept of the dummy fairy. The only thing is he shares a room with his four y.o brother and I don't want poor ds1 to be kept up by ds2 crying for his dummy at nighthmm Hopefully it won't be long before it's forgotten.

baddyfreckleface Thu 30-Jan-14 12:29:45

Dd is just two and I have no plans to get rid of it until she is old enough to understand why she suddenly can't have her favourite thing. Her speech is great and like a pp said I do make sure if she is talking she takes it out.

I try to distract her in the day rather than give it to her but she is quite a worrier and it would make my and her days harder if there wasn't something that soothed her as well as me.

Without her dummy dd would find certain times of her day more stressful (she hates the school run - too many people!) and I would much rather her feel more relaxed with her dummy in for now.

Don't feel pressured by people who don't know your DS as well as you. All children are different. You are aware of the downside to dummy's and want the best for your son. You can make the decision to get rid of them how and when you want.

CamelBalls Thu 30-Jan-14 12:33:49

Im a nanny and have successfully (no crying) weaned 5 different children off thier dummies (only one didnt work as Mum kept getting more) from about 2.5 onwards

I gather up all of the dummies from the house and put them in a bowl and with the children say along the lines of WOW you have lots of dummies, when they have broken, we won't get anymore as your such a big boy/girl! They are only allowed one, and what I do every day (or every two days depending) cut the top of the teat off so it doesn't suck right, when they suck it they know it isn't right so will let you know, I get them to put it in the bin and say that one is broken, remember when they are all broken no more dummies! And will give them a new one...process can take 1/2 weeks depending on how many dummies and if you do it very slowly

If they are getting a bit clingy/upset about it, when they throw a dummy away I give them a sticker and say when you have got 10 stickers (however many stickers for how many dummies you have) we will go and get a special treat

Good luck!

CamelBalls Thu 30-Jan-14 12:34:34

Im a nanny and have successfully (no crying) weaned 5 different children off thier dummies (only one didnt work as Mum kept getting more) from about 2.5 onwards

I gather up all of the dummies from the house and put them in a bowl and with the children say along the lines of WOW you have lots of dummies, when they have broken, we won't get anymore as your such a big boy/girl! They are only allowed one, and what I do every day (or every two days depending) cut the top of the teat off so it doesn't suck right, when they suck it they know it isn't right so will let you know, I get them to put it in the bin and say that one is broken, remember when they are all broken no more dummies! And will give them a new one...process can take 1/2 weeks depending on how many dummies and if you do it very slowly

If they are getting a bit clingy/upset about it, when they throw a dummy away I give them a sticker and say when you have got 10 stickers (however many stickers for how many dummies you have) we will go and get a special treat

Good luck!

loveisagirlnameddaisy Thu 30-Jan-14 12:43:54

My DD was so passionate about her dummies I actually thought she'd still have them when she left home!

I weaned her off it in the day at 2 and from then till just a few weeks ago (she's 4 and a bit), she was still having them in bed. The last 2 remaining dummies finally fell apart at Christmas so that was that. Although she won't throw away the stubs!! grin

I figured they were her comfort blanket and no one would take that from a child of 4. Plus they fell out as soon as she went to sleep and as far as I know weren't used much in the night. Her teeth and speech are both perfect.

MmeLindor Thu 30-Jan-14 12:52:13

My DD was another one who LOVED her dummy. I stopped giving it to her during the day, only for sleeps.

Then we had the dummy fairy come at a lunchtime sleep - I reckoned that even if she did cry, it would only be a short sleep messed up.

I remember her wailing 'tell the dummy fairy to come back, and take the present away. I want my dummy back'.

That evening she cried again, but we stayed firm. Next day she didn't even ask for it.

She was just over 3yrs old and her teeth were being damaged by it - she would turn her dummy upside down.

FitzgeraldProtagonist Thu 30-Jan-14 13:00:27

DS1 was totally addicted, drove me bonkers. Didn't care about bribes, dummy fairy, anything. Screamed house down at night if couldn't find it. I refused to buy more when he got to just shy of his 4th birthday. He started to bite the last one. It got a hole in. It disintegrated more and more until it was just a stub. Then he didn't bother anymore. His brother followed suit the week after.

He had to decide. Wouldn't have done it if I had made him. But was like a light switch. Dummy one day, gone the next. Brilliant. He was honestly totally addicted and we must have had ten of them in the house at any one time.

FitzgeraldProtagonist Thu 30-Jan-14 13:01:08

nb borken dummies can be choking hazard I am told, so I snipped off the raggedy bits.

TheresLotsOfFarmyardAnimals Thu 30-Jan-14 13:05:26

We just threw ours away but he wasn't asking for it, we would just occasionally give it to him so we could get a few minutes peace whilst making dinner etc.

Camels idea sounds great.

mrsjay Thu 30-Jan-14 14:56:28

op tell your husband and the health visitor she will stop her dummy eventualy but least she isnt sucking her thumb, that isn't a dig at thumb suckers but it must be harder to stop that habit than a dummy habit, I would wean slowly but i was a wuss and then eventually have it for bed I am sure I got dd to leave it under her pillow when she got up in the morning. I tried dummy fairy bribery telling her she was not a baby pleaded with her let her cry the only way i did it was slowly and baby steps but as i said I was a wuss, dd2 used to suck pon a blanket or her clothes or a label she was still doing that IN CLASS at 9

rabbitlady Thu 30-Jan-14 15:10:32

my dad saw a comedian on television using a dummy, and quickly whipped the dummy (dodie) out of my brother's mouth, pointed to the screen and said ?"look! that man stole your dodie!"
brother believed it. that would be... end of 1963.

the urge to suck exists for survival purposes and will continue until around the age of eight years. if you're stealing the dodie, do find something to replace it or the child will spend a lifetime smoking, overeating etc.

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